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Germany To Drop 2020 Climate Targets

November 17, 2014
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By Paul Homewood

 

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http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-London/2014/11/17/Germanys-Social-Democrats-Descend-in-Uproar

 

Since the Federal elections in Germany, earlier this year, there has been a running battle between Sigmar Gabriel, minister for economic affairs and energy, and Barbara Hendricks, the environmental minister.

Gabriel has been keen to drop CO2 targets, because of the damage they have been doing to the economy, while his colleague takes the opposite view. According to Der Spiegel, it is Gabriel who has won the battle.

 

Breitbart report:

 

Read more…

Who Is Guy Smith?

November 17, 2014

By Paul Homewood

 

St Osyth Farmer Guy Smith has been elected NFU vice president

 

I reported yesterday on how the NFU (National Farmers Union) Vice President, Guy Smith, had been making nonsensical claims about the weather becoming more volatile at a Parliamentary event last week.

 

So who is Guy Smith? And, more to the point, does he reflect the concerns of ordinary farmers?

 

Smith was elected to his new post in February this year, but according to the East Anglian Daily Times:

 

He has represented Essex on the NFU’s Council for eight years and is a former regional chairman of NFU East Anglia. He also chairs the NFU’s communications committee and wrote the book marking the NFU’s centenary in 2008.

 

The structure of the NFU has been criticised in the past as being “elitist, undemocratic and deeply embedded with multinational businesses”.

Read more…

NFU Vice President Forgets His History

November 16, 2014

By Paul Homewood  

 

 

h/t Joe Public

 

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http://www.nfuonline.com/news/latest-news/climate-change-risks-and-opportunities-for-uk/?

 

The NFU report on a Parliamentary event about climate change:

 

Climate change will increasingly pose serious challenges to Britain, but addressing climate change will bring significant opportunities for British business.

Guy Smith_170_255

That was the conclusion of a parliamentary event attended by NFU Vice President Guy Smith this week in response to the IPPC report, on weather and climate change.

Mr Smith, who farms near Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, spoke about the need for farmers to recognise that the weather is getting more volatile, as are the markets while the need to invest in farms to make them weatherproof is essential.

“In 2013 on my farm we had the wettest winter in living memory, the strongest winds since 1987, the highest tides since 1953. When you see all that come together in a short window you realise that maybe something is going on.”

Faced with volatility, he said that the art of farming becomes more speculative. “This leads to a lack of confidence in agriculture as to what the future might hold, and my worry is that that may lead to a lack of investment in our farms just when we should be investing more in terms of weather proofing them.”

 

 

What on earth has he been smoking? Surely a farmer, of all people, would have understood that weather has always been volatile.

 

Let’s take his claims one by one.

 

Read more…

The Summer of 1912

November 16, 2014

By Paul Homewood 

 

Just one more thing about the wet weather in August 1912.

 

 

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http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/media/pdf/m/9/Aug1912.pdf

 

As well as East Anglia being badly affected, the South West also suffered, as it does more often than not in these situations.

The Met Office report for August 1912 gave rainfall for the month of 12.1 inches (307mm) at Ilfracombe, a coastal town in North Devon.

The nearest location to Ilfracombe, which the Met Office give historical data for, is the RAF station at Chivenor, only about 10 miles or so away, and also near the coast. Their data only goes back to 1951, so we cannot check numbers in 1912.

However, during last winter, when the South West was as badly affected by the weather as anywhere, the wettest month was January, with 153mm. Indeed, the whole winter only totalled 440mm.

 

The British Rainfall publication for 1912 gives the monthly rainfall figures for Barnstaple, which is just a couple of miles from Chivenor.

 

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Summer rainfall totalled 21.03 inches, or 534mm. For summer, this is a phenomenal amount, with the climatological average being just 200mm. Remember as well that summers are usually much drier than winters.

So, for summer rainfall in 1912 to be 94mm more than last winter’s total shows just how remarkable the weather was that year. Over England & Wales as a whole, the summer of 1912 remains the wettest on record, since 1766, with 1879 and 1829 ranked second and third.

 

 

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http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/climate/gcj49s6yc

The Great Flood of 1912

November 16, 2014

By Paul Homewood 

 

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 The road bridge which crossed the River Yare at Lakenham was also destroyed during the floods.

 

I mentioned yesterday that August 1912 was the wettest summer month on record in the UK. The Met Office report for the month shows just how extreme the weather was.

 

Read more…

Early Freeze Up For The Great Lakes

November 16, 2014

By Paul Homewood 

 

h/t Joe Public

 

 

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http://abcnews.go.com/US/ice-visible-lake-superior-weeks-ahead-schedule/story?id=26939239

 

 

I don’t suppose we will hear this news from Roger Harrabin anytime soon.

 

ABC report:

 

Cold temperatures and snow across the Great Lakes in November is certainly nothing out of the ordinary, but this morning, a layer of ice was visible on parts of Lake Superior in Ashland, Wis.

While this may not seem unusual given the current stretch of unseasonably cold temperatures, it is actually several weeks earlier than normal.

The first sightings of ice on Lake Superior and the Great Lakes overall usually occur during the beginning to middle of December. However, a perfect combination of last season’s record ice coverage, cooler summer temperatures, and an early blast of arctic air this fall has allowed for areas of ice to form earlier than normal for the second year in a row.

PHOTO: Ice, on average, usually begins to form in shallow parts of the Great Lakes

Last winter featured relentless, record breaking cold leading to the second highest ice coverage on record for the Great Lakes as a whole.

Lake Superior also set a record for the longest length of time that ice was observed on the lake. In 2013, ice was first observed on Nov. 25, and it did not all melt until early June 2014.

PHOTO: Ice coverage on Lake Superior for the 2013-2014 season

The extent and longevity of the ice coverage were both equally impressive. It is also important to note that this year the ice is being observed about 10 days earlier that last year’s record-breaking season. However, an early start to ice formation does not mean another record breaking ice coverage season is on the way. The overall winter pattern over the next few months will ultimately determine where this year’s ice coverage will go.

Read the rest here.

You Think It’s Wet Now?

November 15, 2014

By Paul Homewood 

 

We seem to have had plenty of very wet months in recent years in the UK, particularly during the autumn of 2000, summers of 2007 and 2012, and of course last winter. But how do they compare with similar events in the past.

 

Using the England & Wales precipitation series, starting in 1766, I have identified the top ten wettest months. (The figures are up to October 2014).

 

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http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadukp/data/monthly/HadEWP_monthly_qc.txt

 

The only month to figure since 1940 was Nov 2009.

The wettest month of all was October 1903, with 218.1mm, well above any other month. (For comparison, the wettest month last winter was January with 184.6mm).

August 1912, (the wettest summer month) and December 1914 also figure in the period just after the turn of the century, which certainly had more than its fair share.

 

Claims that global warming is leading to more extreme rainfall seem to be just one more myth.

 

Read more…

“Hottest Year” Update

November 15, 2014

By Paul Homewood

 

While NASA and NOAA proclaim we are headed towards the “hottest year on record”,

 

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http://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/

 

what do the more accurate satellite systems tell us?

 

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http://data.remss.com/msu/monthly_time_series/RSS_Monthly_MSU_AMSU_Channel_TLT_Anomalies_Land_and_Ocean_v03_3.txt

 

 

 

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http://vortex.nsstc.uah.edu/data/msu/t2lt/uahncdc_lt_5.6.txt

 

 

According to RSS, the YTD anomaly ranks a very ordinary 7th warmest since 1998. UAH make it tie 3rd.

Both are well below the two hottest years in 1998 and 2010.

We have been continually told that the satellite data will catch up with the surface data after a lag, but it has stubbornly refused to do so.

 

There is absolutely no way this year will get anywhere those record years on the satellite datasets, which is precisely why we will hear nothing about it from NASA, NOAA or the MSM.

The BBC’s Misleading Image Of Fracking Well

November 15, 2014
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By Paul Homewood

 

And then there’s shale gas!

 

This is the image that the BBC have been showing in this week’s report on fracking. (Yes it’s Harrabin again!)

 

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-30013668

 

And this is really what the scale should look like.

 

Read more…

More Deceptive Images From The BBC

November 15, 2014
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By Paul Homewood

 

h/t Ron Hughes 

 

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-24742770 

 

While we’re on the topic of BBC deception, take a look at this image of a coal power station from last year.

 

Bear in mind, that in 2009 the BBC Trust noted that this guidance had already been issued by BBC News on how to deal with images of cooling towers.

 

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http://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2014/11/13/harrabin-ignores-bbc-guidelines-on-cooling-tower-images/

 

The McGrath article appears to break just about every bit of the guidance:

1) The caption talks about “coal-fired plants like this”, without explaining that the cooling towers have nothing to do with CO2, and would look similar on, say, a nuclear plant.

2) It is hard to see how the cooling towers could be given more prominence.

3) The photo is used in the headline.

 

 

As for the grossly deceptive impression that black smoke is being given off, this is in clear breach of the BBC Guidelines, which state:

 

Care should be taken not to use images to mislead the audience.

 

 

 

 Was McGrath disciplined for this gross breach of guidelines? Or was he given a bonus?