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BBC Bang The Drum For DECC & The EU

December 18, 2014

By Paul Homewood 

 

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-30518649

 

Let’s leave aside the fact that the BBC say the economy is now growing (they usually try to deny it)! It can be no coincidence that the BBC have chosen to make a splash of this story, just days after DECC were forced to reveal how electricity prices would be 40% higher because of climate policies.

 

According to their story, we are now using less electricity, because of EU regulations making sure products are more energy efficient.

 

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According to their figures, average electricity consumption has fallen by 9.5% since 2008. DECC figures show a slightly lower drop for domestic users of 5.3%, although this does not take allow for increasing population. There are many things I could say, such as:

 

1) Last winter was mild.

2) Many of the energy efficiencies would have been delivered by a free market, without any govt intervention, just as they always have in the past. People expect to benefit from things like this as technological advances occur.

3) To put savings into perspective, you need to take account of the price of goods. It is no use saving a few pence of electricity for a twisty light bulb, if the darned thing costs a tenner in the first place.

4) A large part of energy savings is simply because people cannot afford to use as much, as prices soar.

5) Many elderly people will see no benefit at all from all these appliances, as they either have no need of them, or cannot afford them.

 

Nevertheless, let us take these figures at face value.

 

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DECC Increase Staffing By 35%

December 18, 2014
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By Paul Homewood 

 

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http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/blog/9026/numbers-game-the-latest-civil-service-staff-numbers/

 

At a time of austerity, I am sure we will all be pleased to see that DECC have managed to increase their staffing levels by 35% since 2010, according to the Institute for Government.

Figures from the Office for National Statistics confirm that numbers of staff have increased from 1120, in Q4 2010, to a current level of 1510. (See here and here).

 

The only other departments to have increased staffing during this time are the Department for International Development and the Cabinet Office.

 

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Global Sea Ice For Dec 14th Highest Since 1988

December 16, 2014
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By Paul Homewood   

 

Reposted from SunshineHours

 

 

Global sea ice extent is now at its highest level since 1988, and the fourth highest on the satellite record, for Day 348.

 

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http://sunshinehours.wordpress.com/2014/12/15/sea-ice-extent-day-348-highest-global-sea-ice-since-1988/

The Cost Of The UK Govt’s Climate Policies

December 16, 2014

By Paul Homewood

 

 

I looked the other day at the impact on electricity bills of UK climate policies, which showed that, by 2020, prices could be 40% higher than they would be otherwise. But what does this mean in terms of overall costs in the UK?

 

The overall cost for domestic users is pretty simple to work out, as DECC give us the annual consumption of electricity by sector, which last year was 113TWh. Under the central assumption of fossil fuel prices, which assumes small real price increases between now and 2020, the price of electricity is forecast by the government to be £53/MWh higher than the price of £141 without climate policies.

On an annual usage of 113TWh, therefore, this equates to an extra cost a year of £6.0bn by 2020. (The cost already being incurred this year is said to be £2.7bn).

Under the assumption of lower fossil fuel prices, which we are currently seeing, this cost increases to £6.2bn by 2020.

(Remember that all these costs are calculated at 2014 prices, so do not allow for normal inflation in years to come).

It is also worth bearing in mind that demand for electricity from domestic users is more likely to increase rather than fall, despite government projections to the contrary, as decarbonisation of transport and domestic heating is stepped up. Usage last year was 2% higher than 2011, despite the mild winter.

 

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What Are Weather Bombs?

December 16, 2014

By Paul Homewood

 

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“Weather Bombs” tick all the right alarmist boxes:

  • It’s sexy, so it sells papers.
  • It gives the impression of the sort of wild, violent weather that “scientists” have said we could expect.
  • It sounds like some new phenomena, that we never used to have in the good old days of low CO2.

So what is a weather bomb, and is it in any way unusual? Fortunately, the Met Office give us the low down.

 

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And Pigs Might Fly!

December 16, 2014
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By Paul Homewood

 

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http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/rising-sea-levels-could-make-florida-residents-climate-refugees-1.2871710

 

CBC report:

 

Florida’s vulnerability to the effects of climate change doesn’t seem at first blush to be a Canadian issue.

But every year, some 3.5 million Canadians travel to the sunshine state. What’s more, about half a million Canadians own property in Florida, much of it at risk from rising sea levels.

A lot of that property, particularly if it’s situated along one of the coveted stretches of Miami’s fabled beaches, could well be worthless and literally underwater in a few decades, says Harold Wanless, the chair of the department of Geological Sciences at the University of Miami.

His word for the future of Miami and much south Florida? Doomed.

The “monster” in climate change, as Wanless sees it, is a warming ocean. Sea levels will rise because water expands as it gets warmer, and oceans are taking up vast amounts of heat produced by global warming.

Warmer water is also driving the accelerated melting of the vast ice sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica.

Wanless says a two-metre rise in sea level by 2100 is likely, but says it’s also plausible it could be as much as five metres by the end of the century, and it will continue rising for centuries after that.

 

 

And the facts?

 

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China & India To Lead Growth In Coal Demand Say IEA

December 16, 2014
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By Paul Homewood

 

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http://www.powerengineeringint.com/index.html 

 

 

Latest news from PEI:

 

China leads as global coal demand set to reach 9bn tonnes by 2019

The world’s appetite for coal-fired power will continue to grow over the next five years, according to the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) Medium-Term Coal Market Report, released today. The report found that global demand is set to reach 9 billion tonnes by 2019, with China accounting for three-fifths of demand growth.

During this period, the IEA projects that the world’s coal demand will grow at 2.6 per cent, or more than 100 million tonnes (Mt), per year. Low prices due to oversupply, as well as efficiencies and economies of scale put in place by coal producers, will contribute to continuing growth.

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No, Seth, Weather Disasters Aren’t Getting Worse.

December 15, 2014
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By Paul Homewood

 

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http://www.cbsnews.com/news/hotter-weirder-how-climate-change-has-changed-earth/

 

Among the various fact free claims made in this Borenstein article, which I debunked a couple of weeks ago, was this concerning weather disasters. 

 

Since 1992, there have been more than 6,600 major climate, weather and water disasters worldwide, causing more than $1.6 trillion in damage and killing more than 600,000 people, according to the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters in Belgium, which tracks the world’s catastrophes.

While climate-related, not all can be blamed on man-made warming or climate change. Still, extreme weather has noticeably increased over the years, says Debby Sapir, who runs the center and its database. From 1983 to 1992 the world averaged 147 climate, water and weather disasters each year. Over the past 10 years, that number has jumped to an average 306 a year.

Sapir and others say it would be wrong to pin all, or even most, of these increases on climate change alone. Population and poverty are major factors, too. But they note a trend of growing extremes and more disasters, and that fits with what scientists have long said about global warming.

It’s this increase that’s "far scarier" than the simple rise in temperatures, University of Illinois climate scientist Donald Wuebbles says.

 

So let’s take a closer look at the detail.

 

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More WWF Propaganda About The Philippines

December 15, 2014

By Paul Homewood    

 

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https://uk.news.yahoo.com/observers-slam-lackluster-lima-climate-deal-104854958.html#R3U18dG

 

A carbon-curbing deal struck in Lima on Sunday was a watered-down compromise where national intransigence threatened the goal of a pact to save Earth’s climate system, green groups said.

The hard-fought agreement sets out guidelines for the submission of national greenhouse-gas pledges next year.

But, the groups said, initially ambitious standards became weaker the longer the talks wound on.

In a tug-of-war between rich and developing nation interests, the end result was a "lackluster plan with little scientific relevancy," said WWF’s climate expert, Samantha Smith.

"Against the backdrop of extreme weather in the Philippines and potentially the hottest year ever recorded, governments at the UN climate talks in Lima opted for a half-baked plan to cut emissions," she added.

 

Climate expert, is she? Then she really ought to know that extreme weather is the norm for the Philippines. And don’t just take my word for it, this is what the Philippines own Met Agency, PAGASA, has to say about typhoons:

 

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Oh Dear! Oh Dear Oh Dear! Oh Dear Oh Dear Oh Dear!!!!

December 14, 2014

By Paul Homewood

 

h/t Catweazle

 

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http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-London/2014/12/13/UN-Climate-Summit-Generated-More-CO2-Than-Small-Country

 

From Breitbart:

 

The 12-day UN climate change summit in Peru has generated more carbon dioxide than an entire African country. The talks, aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions worldwide, generated more than 50,000 tonnes of CO2, as more than 12,500 politicians, green activists, diplomats and journalists jetted in to Lima.

The emissions give these talks the largest ever carbon footprint for a United Nations climate summit, and is greater than the emissions produced whole countries such as Malawi, Fiji, Sierra Leone or Barbados over the same period.

The UN made the admission as delegates struggled to negotiate any meaningful, binding measures to reduce carbon emissions. Although talks were supposed to finish Friday, they are expected to run into the weekend as the nations fail to reach agreement on crucial measures.

Jorge Alvarez, coordinator for the UN Development Programme, said the carbon emissions were so high because plans to run the summit on green energy did not work out. The conference has instead been powered by diesel generators.

 

 

Read the rest here.