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Now NSIDC Admit It – Arctic Wind Patterns Support Melting & Ice Export

October 29, 2012
tags: ,

By Paul Homewood

 

Figure 4. Sea level pressure for June 2007 to 2012 compared to averages over the period 1981 to 2010. The Arctic dipole anomaly refers to the combination of unusually high pressure over the northern Beaufort Sea and Greenland and unusually low pressure over northern Eurasia.
Credit: NSIDC courtesy NOAA/ESRL PSD

 

NSIDC have recently released the results of research by James Overland of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Jennifer Francis of Rutgers University that confirms that Arctic wind patterns since 2007 have been at least partially responsible for melting sea ice as well as pushing it out through the Fram Strait.

The full report is shown below.

 

Recent research led by James Overland of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Jennifer Francis of Rutgers University shows that the Arctic dipole anomaly, featuring unusually high pressure over the northern Beaufort Sea and Greenland and unusually low pressure over northeastern Eurasia, has become more common in the early summer of recent years.

As discussed in previous posts, this pattern brings in warm southerly winds along the shores of the East Siberian and Chukchi seas. It favours strong ice melt in these sectors and pushes the ice away from the coast, leaving open water. The pressure pattern also favours the transport of ice out of the Arctic Ocean and into the North Atlantic through Fram Strait.

The Arctic dipole anomaly was very well developed throughout the summer of 2007 and was in part responsible for the very low September ice extent recorded that year (the second lowest in the satellite record). According to Overland and colleagues, no other six-year period matches the intensity and persistence of the June pattern for 2007 to 2012 in the past sixty-three years. The pattern is linked to the general weakening of the circumpolar jet stream and the greater meandering of this wind flow.

 

http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/

2 Comments
  1. October 29, 2012 10:17 pm

    Well, blow me down. Who’d a thunk?

  2. October 31, 2012 11:27 am

    “… no other six-year period matches the intensity and persistence of the June pattern for 2007 to 2012 in the past sixty-three years…”
    Conclusion: climate change is happening? Of course, but NOT caused by CO2, the Sun did it. Previous warm years didn’t have this “persistence” because the solar radiation was different then.
    These anomalous high pressure conditions, causing extreme weather in localized places, should continue during the present transition between a previous warmer climate and the new colder climate that will follow soon.
    Interesting comment of Phil Rockke here:
    http://iceagenow.info/2012/05/cycles-coming/#comment-27128
    excerpt:
    ” … The period of pre-glacial ‘ringing’ from 2013-2017 (for all intents and purposes, the ‘warning sign’), may very well catch the eye of the broader scientific community, as the circulatory system should evolve into a chaotic mess.. the ENSO cycle will weaken dramatically into a largely neutral state, global weather extremes will be prevalent …”
    His conclusion? We may be in for a new Ice Age, caused by the Sun of course.

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