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Team Moron Worse Than We Thought!

May 28, 2013

By Paul Homewood

 

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http://www.sciamdigital.com/index.cfm?fa=Products.ViewIssuePreview&ARTICLEID_CHAR=64ECAFBF-237D-9F22-E8DCDB7EFA52784C

 

When Team Moron tells us that “global warming is faster than expected”, apparently they mean this.

 

 

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https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2013/02/06/met-office-decadal-forecast2007-version/

4 Comments
  1. Jeffery permalink
    May 28, 2013 2:23 pm

    Paul:

    I cancelled my annual subscription to Scientific American in the ’90’s when they were attacking Lomborg. I had been a faithful and proud reader from the late 70’s, but it was obvious that with their editorial change at that time, green was the new direction, and the political slant was just too much for me to take. I could no longer regard it as a scientific publication. Sad.

  2. MoscowEast permalink
    May 28, 2013 4:23 pm

    I had a similar experience to you, Jeffery. I was shocked by Scientific American’s response to Lomborg’s book (The Skeptical Environmentalist). Their response really opened my eyes to activism masquerading as science journalism, something which I’d never thought of before then, but which now more obviously pervades the media. I was a young lecturer in chemistry at a top university in the UK at the time and I was full of Feynman-like love and belief in science. I retain that love, but I know that many of those who claim to promote science do no such thing – instead their political agenda comes first and the science must be molded in such a way as to make it fit.

    • Jeffery permalink
      May 28, 2013 6:10 pm

      Thanks, MoscowEast. I’ve been chided by educated acquaintances for my choice to cancel that subscription for the reason stated. I have long lamented the lack of rigor in the science education I’ve seen in American public schools from middle grades through high school. How else to explain the susceptibility of the general public to claims that are not sufficiently supported by data or the reluctance to at least search out contrary evidence? People just don’t seem to be able to test claims and interpret data reliably. Unfortunately this inability is not limited to only one end of the political spectrum, it pervades the entire culture. Is there a way to change this, or is this just a permanent educational status quo?

      • MoscowEast permalink
        May 28, 2013 7:24 pm

        ‘How else to explain the susceptibility of the general public to claims that are not sufficiently supported by data or the reluctance to at least search out contrary evidence?’
        There’s probably something in the idea that the general public are susceptible to believing in dubious claims as a result of poor education. I’m sure we’ve both known intelligent people who believed all kinds of nonsense, especially if the nonsense happens to be politically correct. In many cases they have never heard the counter-arguments and completely trust their chosen sources of information, which I suppose is poor education of a sort. Every now and again an alternative viewpoint rears its ugly head into their consciousness, but it’s soon quashed with a little bit of confirmation bias from Auntie Beeb and her ilk. That said, I’m optimistic in some ways about some such matters – eventually reality can no longer be denied and must be acted upon, although often not until much unnecessary suffering has taken place.

        ‘People just don’t seem to be able to test claims and interpret data reliably. Unfortunately this inability is not limited to only one end of the political spectrum, it pervades the entire culture. Is there a way to change this, or is this just a permanent educational status quo?’
        People are very bad at testing claims and interpreting data when they believe someone else is picking up the tab if they get it wrong. Marked improvements can come about only if they face the cost of failure. As an example, we’re seeing this to some extent here in the UK. Just a year or two ago, almost everybody was either for green energy policies or indifferent to them. Now that reality is intruding, in the form of significantly higher energy bills, people are starting to ask why. At the moment there’s somewhat of a brouhaha about energy companies profits (a smokescreen) but a few and a growing few now get it. I hope that eventually the enormous benefit of cheap energy to both individuals and the wider society becomes embedded in the national psyche – which to my mind would mark genuine progress.

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