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Coldest Spring In England Since 1891

June 2, 2013
tags: ,

By Paul Homewood

 

Winter? Teesdale in County Durham blanketed in snow on May 23 in what is likely to be Britain's coldest spring since 1962

Winter? Teesdale in County Durham blanketed in snow on May 23 in what is likely to be Britain’s coldest spring since 1962

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2333312/UK-weather-Spring-coldest-50-years-average-temperature-just-6C.html

 

According to the Central England Temperature Series, England has just experienced its coldest Spring since 1891. The average mean temperature of 6.87C ranks the 31st coldest on records starting in 1659, and is 2 degrees lower than the 1981-2010 average of 8.9C.

 

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The 5-Year average has dropped to 8.9C, a level commonly seen in the 1940’s and 50’s. Although the cold Spring has been due in large part to the exceptionally cold weather in March, which was the coldest since 1892, both April and May have also been much colder than normal.

 

CET Warmer/(Colder) v 1981-2010
March 2013 2.7 (3.9)
April 2013 7.5 (1.0)
May 2013 10.4 (1.3)

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadcet/data/download.html

 

The 12-Month running average continues to drop, and at 8.9C is well below the levels seen for the last decade, and 1.0C lower than the 1981-2010 annual average.

 

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4 Comments
  1. miked1947 permalink
    June 2, 2013 1:23 pm

    If the Observations do not fit the “Forecast”, the Observations must certainly be wrong! 😉

  2. Joe Public permalink
    June 2, 2013 2:08 pm

    Imagine how cold it’d really have been, if we hadn’t been pumping all that CO2 into the atmosphere.

    BTW, at the end of 2012, did our Met Office predict a ‘cold’ Spring??

  3. June 2, 2013 6:11 pm

    I gave a deterministic solar based forecast for at least 3 weeks very cold conditions through March 2013. It was clear to me that it was a much colder signal than the any of the other cold shots through Jan and Feb.

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