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Snow Cover Above Normal In November For Northern Hemisphere

December 18, 2013
tags: ,

By Paul Homewood

 

 

image

http://satepsanone.nesdis.noaa.gov/northern_hemisphere_multisensor.html

 

 

 

Northern Hemisphere snow extent again looks likely to be above normal this year, continuing the trend of the last decade, according to Rutgers.

 

 

image

http://climate.rutgers.edu/snowcover/chart_seasonal.php?ui_set=nhland&ui_season=1

 

Figures for November show that snow cover was above the 1981-2010 mean, although not as great as the last two years.

Indeed, it has been above normal for most of this year, except for May through July, when extent is tiny anyway.

 

image

http://climate.rutgers.edu/snowcover/table_rankings.php?ui_set=1

image

http://climate.rutgers.edu/snowcover/chart_anom.php?ui_set=1&ui_region=nhland&ui_month=11

3 Comments
  1. December 19, 2013 1:26 am

    the amount of snow depends on the availability of raw material for snow; same as for rain. I f there is moisture in the air it rains or snow. It’s all up to the ”availability of water vapor” which the Warmist are demonizing water vapor: http://globalwarmingdenier.wordpress.com/midi-ice-age-can-be-avoided/

  2. December 19, 2013 2:00 am

    Reblogged this on CraigM350.

  3. Dr K.A. Rodgers permalink
    December 20, 2013 1:51 am

    What does “normal” mean? In this context it is a shonky term all too frequently used by the climatic catastrophic lot. It is obfuscating shorthand; pretend science.

    Might I suggest reports/comments like this exhibit a more precision in their word usage. “Mean” did mange to squeeze-in momentarily but a phrase is probably needed for clarity.

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