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1929/30 Was Wetter In Southern England

February 5, 2014

By Paul Homewood

 

January 2014 Rainfall 1981 - 2010 anomaly

 

As I did with rainfall patterns yesterday for the whole of England, let’s take a similar look at the southern half of the country.

 

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http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/summaries/datasets

 

As can be seen, there have been three years since 1910, with higher rainfall over the Oct – Jan period:

1929/30

1961/61

2000/01

 

 

Rainfall in the last four months of 487mm has not been exceeded in any of the Nov – Feb periods, though 1914/15 and 1929/30 come very close.

As with country totals, it is not apparent that there are any trends to greater levels of rainfall over these months, nor any greater extremity or variation.

Take, for instance, the period around 1930. The years leading up to the record rainfall of 1929/30 were consistently wet ones, but were then followed by a run of much drier years.

 

1914/15

I have mentioned that the period from November 1914 to February 1915 was an exceptionally wet one, and the Met Office monthly reports at the time give a good flavour.

 

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http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/media/pdf/5/5/Nov1914.pdf

 

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http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/media/pdf/5/1/Dec1914.pdf

 

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http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/media/pdf/g/g/Jan1915.pdf

 

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http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/media/pdf/6/2/Feb1915.pdf

 

Note the reference to large areas of low lying country in southern England being flooded.

Other things that stand out across the four months.

  • The frequency of storms and gales.
  • There was very little snow.
  • The concentration of rain in the south, and what the January report refers to as “a feature of the rainfall in both December and January is the very large percentage in regions usually relatively dry.

 

It is clear that meteorological conditions have been very similar this winter to those in 1914/15, and with similar results. There is no reason to look for a cause based in “climate change”.

Real experts, such as HH Lamb, would have analysed and compared the meteorological data, in order to obtain a better understanding. He certainly would have been eager to make use of the wealth of data available these days from satellites and other sources, and would have undoubtedly furthered our understanding of such matters.

Unfortunately, these days it is too easy to point the finger at CO2, and collect your grant money.

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5 Comments
  1. February 5, 2014 5:01 pm

    Reblogged this on CraigM350.

  2. A C Osborn permalink
    February 5, 2014 6:26 pm

    There is no MONEY in telling the truth is there?

  3. Andy DC permalink
    February 5, 2014 10:00 pm

    It is just a persistent weather pattern, not climate change.

    • February 8, 2014 2:10 pm

      Unfortunately that doesn’t prevent people using as evidence of “climate change”, without actually defining what they mean by the term.

  4. February 8, 2014 2:07 pm

    The damage to the railway at Dawlish was nothing new either.

    https://www.mtholyoke.edu/courses/rschwart/ind_rev/iln/accident.htm#sdevon

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