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It’s Cold That Causes Famines, Not Warmth

June 1, 2014

 

 

By Paul Homewood

 

Climate Change Dispatch have an interesting guest post from Dennis T Avery, an agricultural and environmental economist:

 

 

Carbon dioxide won’t cause famines

 

 

Historian Geoffrey Parker is the author of Global Crisis: War, Climate Change and Catastrophe in the 17th Century. In a recent opinion piece, he suggested that the desperate climate from 1600 to 1700 is a template for human collapse in our twenty-first century. There are two massive flaws in his theory.

Almost all past agricultural and cultural collapses occurred during “little ice ages,” not during our many global warm periods. In addition, today’s seeds, fertilizers and modern farming techniques and technologies are far superior to anything mankind possessed during previous crises.

The seventeenth century was part of the 550-year Little Ice Age, the most recent of at least seven “little ice ages” that have befallen the planet since the last Pleistocene Ice Age ended some 13,000 years ago. Studying sediment deposits in the North Atlantic, Gerard Bond of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory found such centuries-long “little ice ages” beginning at 1300 AD, 600 AD, 800 BC, 2200 BC, 3900 BC, 7400 BC, 8300 BC, and perhaps at 9100 BC. In fact, these worldwide Dansgaard-Oeschger disasters arrived on a semi-regular basis some 600 times over the past million years.

Each of these icy ages blasted humanity with short, cold, cloudy growing seasons, untimely frosts, and extended droughts interspersed with heavy and violent rains. Naturally, their crops failed. Humanity’s cities starved to death, repeatedly – with seven collapses in Mesopotamia, six each for Egypt and China, two for Angkor Wat and at several calamities in Europe.

The early cultures gave the illusion of continuity: the Nile and the Yangtze always had at least a little irrigation water. However, “little ice age” hunger and disease drove human and animal migrations across thousands of miles and over continents, led to major invasions like the Huns into Europe’s Dark Ages, and caused the collapse of kingships and ruling dynasties around the globe.

While acknowledging the existence of the cold, chaotic periods, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has barely factored them into its computer models. The IPCC seems to think it is just coincidence that our warm and relatively stable Modern Warming directly followed the latest awful Little Ice Age.

Moreover, our recent climate has been more stable than the chaotic “little ice ages.” Iraq has not had a three-century drought recently. The Volga River Valley has not been too flooded to farm for 700 years, as happened after 600 BC. British logbooks show the Little Ice Age featured more than twice as many major hurricanes making landfall in the Caribbean, compared to the twentieth century.

 

 

 

Read the rest here.

 

 

Dennis T. Avery is an agricultural and environmental economist and a senior fellow for the Heartland Institute in Chicago and the Center for Global Food Issues in Virginia. He was formerly a senior analyst for the U.S. Department of State and is co-author, with S. Fred Singer, of Unstoppable Global Warming Every 1500 Years.

3 Comments
  1. June 1, 2014 12:32 pm

    Thanks, Paul. An excellent post.
    From the very beginning of this CAGW cult I have been saying that cold kill faster and deeper than warm.
    But people like to be scared, it seems.

  2. June 1, 2014 8:01 pm

    O/t but appropriate here…
    “Global warming will lead to a significant increase in extreme summer downpours in the UK, a study suggests. The Met Office and Newcastle University researchers say there could be five times the number of “extreme rainfall events” per hour, under extreme warming projections. This would cause “really severe” flash flooding in many parts of the UK, according to the scientists. However, they caution that this result is based on only one computer model
    […]
    Dr Lizzie Kendon, the report’s lead author told BBC News.”It is the same one that is used for the weather forecasts on the BBC, so it is incredibly realistic and it represents these very intense convective-type storms that haven’t been captured before.”The researchers used both the low resolution and the high resolution models to examine the climate patterns that have occurred in recent years and to look ahead to what might happen at the end of this century. They assessed the period up to the year 2100 using the most high-end climate projections from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.”

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-27624478

  3. June 1, 2014 8:02 pm

    Reblogged this on CraigM350.

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