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Electric Prices To Rise By 40%

December 14, 2014

By Paul Homewood

 

h/t Paul2

 

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/energy/11292367/Green-policies-to-add-up-to-40pc-to-cost-of-household-electricity.html

 

 

Don’t say I did not warn you!

 

The cost of household electricity will rise by as much as 40 per cent by the end of the decade because of the Government’s green energy policies.

Official figures — initially withheld by ministers — show an alarming increase in the price of electricity caused by generous subsidies to wind farms as well as other policies.

An average household is expected to pay as much as £250 more for electricity – mainly through consumer subsidies – to pay for the Government’s green energy schemes, while an electrically heated house could be as much as £440 a year worse off.

And by 2030, when thousands of planned offshore wind turbines are finally operating, the burden will be even greater, the numbers show. The average household could be paying an extra 60 per cent for electricity – equivalent to £350 more a year.

Medium-sized businesses will be hit very hard, according to the new data. On average such companies will see electricity bills rise by more than £500,000 a year – a cost likely to be passed on to consumers.

 

The figures were made public last week by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) following a Freedom of Information request by campaigners. The information was initially prepared for an official DECC report – released at the beginning of November – which claimed that the average household fuel bill had fallen by £90 thanks to the “impact of DECC policies”.

But the tables showing the actual cost of green policies on future electricity prices for households and businesses in 2020 and 2030 were kept secret because they were “thought to be confusing”.

Their release now will embarrass ministers, who are accused of presiding over an expensive consumer subsidy system.

The Government’s climate change policies include complex consumer subsidies for wind and solar farms, as well as grants for energy efficiency measures such as loft and wall insulation, available to certain households.

The introduction of smart meters, which it is hoped will encourage lower consumption, also helped contribute to rising electricity prices.

Dr John Constable, director of Renewable Energy Foundation, the think tank whose Freedom of Information request was responsible for forcing DECC to release the price impact tables, said: “The striking scale and increasing trend of the climate policy energy price impacts are bad enough in themselves, but DECC’s attempt to conceal these vitally important figures is breathtaking.”

Dr Constable said he had been told by informed sources that pressure had been put on DECC to withhold the tables.

“This is a very unsatisfactory situation," he said, "Energy price impact data is so intrinsically important, and policy transparency so crucial to public trust in government, that very firm intervention is needed to clear the air and ensure that it will not happen again. This sounds like a job for the Prime Minister.”

DECC’s initial 88-page report was published on Nov 6, but the raw data on which the findings were based were omitted.

 

 

 

Read the rest here.

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11 Comments
  1. December 14, 2014 12:01 pm

    Reblogged this on Petrossa's Blog and commented:
    Germany, UK took the plunge so we don’t have to. Thank you for demonstrating (again) no such thing as a perpetuum mobile (renewable energy) exists. Any sane person could predict you can’t get something for nothing, that the only tenable energy sources are matter/energy conversion or gravity. Why is it so hard to understand you can’t ‘make’ energy but only convert one form to another where stored energy in the form of hydrocarbons or matter/energy conversion release already contained energy thus making it the most productive one? I can’t get my head around people imagining that collecting energy can ever beat releasing captured energy. It’s so blindingly obvious.

    • Johnstoirvin permalink
      December 14, 2014 5:19 pm

      “Why is it so hard to understand you can’t ‘make’ energy but only convert one form to another…?”

      Because the ignorant (not stupid) masses don’t know that law of physics and the AGW zealots desperately strive to keep it that way.

  2. Retired Dave permalink
    December 14, 2014 12:08 pm

    Well Paul, there you go again with a bit of reality. Has it been released to prime us for a change of direction? I hope so but breath I am not holding.

    BUT that nice Mr Davey tells me that all these subsidies will eventually lower my bills and save the planet. But then he is a loon – struggling to not be abusive.

    The thing is that Black will be the new White, upwards will be downwards, and higher bills will mean lower bills. This is in the same insane series as temperatures going up (after manipulation) when they are going down, or at the very least staying still – sea ice melting when it is increasing and snow disappearing when it is at a NH record level for the time of year.

    But of course that is Climate Science for you and its lackeys.in the body politic and the MSM..

  3. Retired Dave permalink
    December 14, 2014 12:12 pm

    I meant to add a link to this piece by Colin McInnes over at his Perpetual Motion Blog.

    http://colinmcinnes.blogspot.co.uk/2014/12/the-rise-of-ineos-and-demise-of-pelmais.html

    More sense in a few paragraphs than Davey will spout in a lifetime.

  4. December 14, 2014 12:52 pm

    Reblogged this on JunkScience.com and commented:
    Energy conservation by adopting policies that drastically increase price, then claim savings because consumers will use less? I think some of that logic drifted across the pond and got into the Clean Power Plan.

    • December 14, 2014 2:22 pm

      ( “The Government’s climate change policies include complex consumer subsidies for wind and solar farms, as well as grants for energy efficiency measures such as loft and wall insulation, available to certain households.” )

      As saveenergy’s wife, I find it offensive the way the government lumps the genuinely useful energy efficiency measures in with the wind and solar subsidies, in an effort to obscure the latter.

  5. Johnstoirvin permalink
    December 14, 2014 5:03 pm

    “….electricity prices for households and businesses…”
    This statement from the article touches on the REST of the iceberg below the surface. Since, without exception, everyone, every business, every facet of government is a consumer of electricity, in addition to household energy costs going up, the cost of every product or service we buy will increase as well. One important fact about the free enterprise system many people either don’t understand or simply ignore is that, either directly or indirectly, the end user (us) ultimately pays ALL costs (plus markup) added to the product or service at each stop along the chain of supply. Bottom line is, there is one, and only one source of revenue for any business or any government… you and I.

  6. December 14, 2014 6:18 pm

    Paul,
    Thanks for showing the real numbers. Money, resources, and opportunities, just flushed away forever. Breathtaking.

  7. December 14, 2014 6:38 pm

    “The information was initially prepared for an official DECC report – released at the beginning of November – which claimed that the average household fuel bill had fallen by £90 thanks to the “impact of DECC policies”.”

    Actually, as the Beeb reports :

    “A government spokesman said that investing in energy efficiency is the best way to reduce long term bills – and that thanks to government policies, bills are an estimated £90 lower this year than they would otherwise have been.” [My bold.]

    There’s a world of difference between those two statements.

    Also, the Beeb ignores, but the Torygraph alludes to the fact that focussing on household bills is deliberately disingenuous. Every household pays not only the direct increase in its own energy bills, it also picks up the tab for the energy-bill increases paid for by all UK industrial & commercial users less that proportion of their output they manage to export. I&C customers use about 25% of the country’s energy, and perhaps 10% of their total is exported. This means that households actually pay an extra 30% made up of increases in the costs of goods & services they buy in.

    • December 14, 2014 7:18 pm

      Not to mention extra costs loaded on govt depts, that we will have to pay for through higher tax or poorer services!

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