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Sea Ice Dynamics

May 27, 2015

By Paul Homewood  

 

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https://rclutz.wordpress.com/2015/05/26/climate-on-ice-ocean-ice-dynamics/

 

Ron Clutz has an informative post about sea ice dynamics:

 

When white men started to explore the north of America, they first encountered the Crees. Hudson Bay posts were established to trade goods for pelts, especially the beavers used for making those tall hats worn by British ceremonial guards.

The Crees told the whites that further on toward the Arctic Circle there were others they called “eskimos”. The Cree word means “eaters of raw meat” and it is derogatory. The Inuit (as they call themselves) were found to have dozens of words for snow, a necessary vocabulary for surviving in the Arctic world.

A recent lexicon of sea ice terminology in Nunavik (Appendix A of the collective work Siku: Knowing our Ice, 2008) comprises no fewer than 93 different words. These include general appellations such as siku, but also terms as specialized as qautsaulittuq, ice that breaks after its strength has been tested with a harpoon; kiviniq, a depression in shore ice caused by the weight of the water that passed over and accumulated on its surface during the tide; or iniruvik, ice that cracked because of tide changes and that the cold weather refroze.

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/inuit-words-for-snow-and-ice/

With such complexity of ice conditions, we must recognize that any general understanding of ocean-ice dynamics will not be descriptive of all micro-scale effects on local or regional circumstances.

 

 

 

Read the rest here.

4 Comments
  1. RockySpears permalink
    May 27, 2015 12:23 pm

    I thought they were Bearskins, not beaver.

    NIce article though: “There’s a cycle”, well who would have guessed?

    • May 27, 2015 4:47 pm

      Yep. But which cycle do you prescribe to?
      Here is the cycle of the last 40 years

      Now try to see the reverse happening for the next 45 years [for the speed of warming/cooling) or so after 2016:
      i.e. hyperbolic instead of parabolic

    • May 27, 2015 7:36 pm

      Rocky, you’re right, those are bearskins. It was gentlemen’s top hats that drove the fur trade, ones like these:

  2. mwhite permalink
    May 27, 2015 6:34 pm

    Just found this on the BBC website

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-32802588

    Apparently with all the worlds glaciers melting tax payers will be paying a fortune to send ice cores to the Antarctic.

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