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Britain’s Damp Summer

September 7, 2015

By Paul Homewood  

 

You may have seen stories that this summer has been unusually wet in the UK. The truth is rather more mundane. 

 

2015_14_Rainfall_Anomaly_1981-2010

 

Overall, this summer’s rainfall of 272mm has only been slightly above the long term average of 244mm, and ranks an unremarkable 31st wettest since 1910.

The wettest summer on record was in 1912.

 

image

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/summaries/datasets

 

Looking at the longer running England & Wales Series, we find that wetter summers were much more common in the 19th and early 20thC, as the Top 50 distribution below illustrates.

 

image

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadukp/data/download.html.

 

image

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadukp/data/download.html

 

  

Perhaps more interesting is the distribution of the driest summers.

 

image

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadukp/data/download.html

 

The driest summer of the lot was 1995. (The drought of 1975/76 still remains by far the most severe of the last century or so, but was a much more drawn out affair). Otherwise, the 19th and early 20thC seem to have had their share of the really dry ones.

 

It all rather goes to show just how variable British weather is in summer.

8 Comments
  1. September 7, 2015 4:28 pm

    I must admit I was finding it difficult to reconcile comments on the BBC with my own experience, although I do live in the NE of England.
    Maybe they were reading it from the Daily Mail.

  2. September 7, 2015 4:36 pm

    It seems to be have been particularly wet on the South coast in August, which is probably what all the fuss was about.

    This was offset as, far as summer is concerned by a dry June.

  3. September 7, 2015 5:30 pm

    Weather hasn’t been bad here all summer. It was only last week of August that was miserable but great for the garden. Think the last week put August ~150% lta but a nice summer overall. The lack of humid nights most appreciated.

  4. September 7, 2015 5:38 pm

    The right amount of rain, however at the worst possible time for the farmers. Dry when the spuds need water, wet when the cereals are ready for harvesting, makes this a very expensive year. Add to that healthy global harvests and a strong pound , leads to low low prices, but very hefty drying costs.

  5. Andy DC permalink
    September 7, 2015 6:03 pm

    Like a vast majority of the US, a striikingly boring and uneventful summer.

  6. john in cheshire permalink
    September 8, 2015 7:26 am

    My impression is that this summer has been particularly wet and cold. We’ve had only two barbecues and on one of them it started to rain just as we’d finished eating.

  7. September 8, 2015 12:25 pm

    Summer here in northern West Virginia has been not unlike those I remember as a child on the same property. Early was wet. I mowed every week (and I have 5 acres) until about mid-July. Since we have had very dry conditions with several days with rain last week. I remember just the opposite in summers, totally wet or totally dry summers and even, even moisture summers. Nothing to see here.

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