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Another Quiet Tornado Year So Far

September 9, 2015

By Paul Homewood 

 

We are now well past the peak of the tornado season in the US, so it is good to see that this year so far tornado numbers have been running well below average.

 

ptorngraph

http://www.spc.noaa.gov/wcm/#data

 

 

This is now the fourth year in a row which has been below average.

 

torngraph-big

http://www.spc.noaa.gov/wcm/torngraph-big.png

 

 

Looking at the longer term data back to 1954, adjusted for the fact that many more tornadoes are reported these days because of technology etc, this year is again shown to be amongst the quieter years.

 

torgraph

http://www.spc.noaa.gov/wcm/adj.html

 

There have been no EF-5’s reported so far this year, the number of stronger EF-3’s and 4’s are also below the long term average, with 27 provisionally reported so far, compared with the climatological average of 37 at this time of year.

 

   

At this time of year, many tornadoes result from tropical storm systems, so with the quiet hurricane season continuing, we can hope that tornado numbers remain low.

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6 Comments
  1. September 9, 2015 11:40 am

    Reblogged this on WeatherAction News.

  2. September 9, 2015 11:54 am

    Dang!! Few tornadoes and no hurricanes. All those “this destruction is due to man-caused global climate change” articles in the circular file to date.

  3. Joe Public permalink
    September 9, 2015 12:09 pm

    The insurance industry will be grieving. The lack of scaremongering headlines will make it even harder to justify increased premiums.

    • AZ1971 permalink
      September 9, 2015 2:00 pm

      They don’t need a current justification for raising premiums. They will, however, use the extra premiums and lower payouts to build financial reserves and line the pockets of investors. Just this morning (9/9) I watched on the news that NYC is suing FEMA over their new flood zone maps, which will put many new areas into high-risk flood prone areas that historically weren’t part of flood zones. This will cause premiums to jump from $5000-$10K a year and price out many homeowners – either preventing them from buying in those areas, or forcing out current residents. And since only the federal government provides flood insurance, they win at the expense of the common taxpayer.

  4. September 9, 2015 4:25 pm

    Thanks, Paul.
    This must be caused by the diminishing levels of atmospheric CO2. sarc/

  5. September 15, 2015 1:32 am

    Reblogged this on Climate Collections.

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