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China Approves Another 155 Coal Fired Power Plants This Year

November 16, 2015
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By Paul Homewood 

  

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http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/12/world/asia/china-coal-power-energy-policy.html?_r=0

 

NY Times reports:

 

ONGXIANPO, China — Just outside the southwest border of Beijing, a new coal-fired power and heating plant is rising in Dongxianpo, a rural town in Hebei Province. Cement mixers roll onto the site. Cranes tower above a landscape of metal girders.

When finished, the plant, run by a company owned by the Beijing government, is expected to have a generating capacity of 700 megawatts of power, more than the total of similar plants in Ohio. But whether it will actually be used to its fullest is questionable, despite the investment of $580 million.

That is because the plant is scheduled to come online in three years amid a glut of coal-fired power plants — an astounding 155 planned projects received a permit this year alone, with total capacity equal to nearly 40 percent of operational coal power plants in the United States.

China’s economic slowdown and the government’s pledges to use more renewable and nuclear energy make some of the country’s existing plants and most or all of the 155 new ones unnecessary, according to interviews with officials and scholars, a review of public statistics and a report released Wednesday about the “coal power bubble” by Greenpeace East Asia. There are already too many plants, as shown by a steady decline in the plants’ average operating hours since 2013….

In the first nine months of this year, state-owned companies received preliminary or full approval to build the 155 coal power plants that have a total capacity of 123 gigawatts, the report said. That capacity is equal to 15 percent of China’s coal-fired power capacity at the end of 2014.

11 Comments leave one →
  1. markl permalink
    November 16, 2015 6:51 pm

    As much as the MSM would like to spin China’s CO2 reduction efforts into positive press for the Warmist Cult it’s obvious they are ignoring, if not thumbing their nose, to the Climate Change narrative. They are neither fools nor affected by the gratuitous shaming and misinformation being spouted about AGW. Even the UN/IPCC toutes China as one of the shining examples of countries that have joined the hysteria when in fact it’s just the opposite. Propaganda at its’ worst.

    • manicbeancounter permalink
      November 16, 2015 9:06 pm

      You are quite right. The Chinese are very much concerned with energy security and strong economic growth. Part of that security can come from nuclear power and hydro. The small investments in wind and solar are countered by another element in the energy security mix – the turning of coal into liquids. The amounts of energy required are vast and from coal as well. The plants might be mothballed at the moment, as they are only viable when oil is greater than $60 a barrel.
      http://manicbeancounter.com/2013/04/30/chinas-renewable-policy-in-context-the-ningxia-example/

  2. Graeme No.3 permalink
    November 16, 2015 9:26 pm

    There is another factor, namely the economic slowdown. Instead of “printing money” to lend to boost bank profits, the Government is employing people and suppliers to build these power stations. I am told that at least one third of China does not yet have grid electricity so extra demand could come from there.
    And if Greenpeace says something, then it is probably wrong.

  3. John F. Hultquist permalink
    November 17, 2015 3:46 am

    My parents, not dirt poor but not well-off, bought an electric refrigerator so long ago no one remembers when. Both parents were raised on hard-scrabble farms. I know the refrigerator was in the kitchen in 1950 and some years later we painted it green because we were painting the kitchen green. Or maybe dad found a can of green paint. Or something. That’s awhile ago.

    My point: I have never known not having electric lights, radio, refrigerator/freezers and other electric appliances. It is tragic that some people want to deny regular electric service to millions.

    If there are regions of China not served by an electric grid then the word “Glut” is inappropriate, and China’s energy policy is in the right direction, although a bit slow.

  4. CheshireRed permalink
    November 17, 2015 9:12 am

    The Chinese know how to play naïve western idiot ‘leaders’ to a tee. Tell them what they want to hear while doing whatever the hell you want in private. Do Greenpeace et al have carbon inspectors roaming around China? Like hell they do, and as a result they have not the first idea of China’s real emissions levels. Proof of that came the other week when China announced revised figures – with the increase being greater than Germany’s entire annual emissions total! We’re being ruled by absolute imbeciles.

  5. November 17, 2015 9:27 am

    Paranoid climate obsessives can console themselves that some of these new plants may be replacing older ‘dirtier’ ones, plus the power they provide should help to reduce the amount of home-burnt material used by householders to keep warm.

  6. November 17, 2015 10:45 am

    I think we can safely say that if Greenpeace are involved here then it’s not going to be true.

  7. November 18, 2015 5:54 am

    I think someone left a zero off the capacity of the power station. 700 MW is around the size of a single steam turbine some years ago ( eg the Mt Piper power station near Lithgow NSW Australia built around 1990 has two units of 660 MW) . These days steam turbine units go upto 1900 MW each (check the Siemens website). The Chinese are installing high efficiency critical pressure boilers with the largest steam turbines available. This station probably has 4 units of 1800MW each. The power station is small compared to the Three Gorges hydro power installation of 32 generators of 700MW (average each) for a total of 24,000 MW.

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  1. China Approves Another 155 Coal Fired Power Plants This Year | NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT | Cranky Old Crow

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