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Is the winter of 2015-16 any more stormy than usual?

February 11, 2016

By Paul Homewood 

 

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https://xmetman.wordpress.com/2016/02/11/is-the-winter-of-2015-16-any-more-stormy-than-usual/ 

 

Xmetman, Bruce, has an interesting analysis of this winter’s stormy weather:

 

Well the short answer to that question is yes the winter of 2015-16 is more stormy than usual so far (February 8), but it’s certainly not the stormiest on record either. The simplest way that I can think of to statistically measure the storminess of the British Isles over any particular month or season, is to use the Gale Index [GI] generated by the Climate Research Unit [CRU] of the University of East Anglia [UEA]. The Gale Index is a by-product of the Objective Lamb Weather Type data series that they maintain and regularly update, and very easy to calculate, but because it uses just a small grid of mean sea level pressures to calculate the index with, it is a little crude.

 

Read the rest here

5 Comments leave one →
  1. February 11, 2016 6:25 pm

    At last some wind data you can get your teeth into.

  2. Ben Vorlich permalink
    February 11, 2016 7:31 pm

    It always puzzles me when a big thing is made of a weather event being more extreme than normal/average. For there to be a normal roughly half winters (or whatever season/month) will be greater(more) than normal and the rest lower(fewer) of the event being measured. Sometimes there will be something which gets towards the extreme and even less frequently the maximum/minimum occurrence for the measuring period will occur. The shorter the record the more likely the latter becomes, the better we get a measuring the more likely the latter becomes.

    Presumably a statistician would be able to tell us the likelihood of this being the stormiest and what effect the better monitoring has had on the odds?

  3. tom0mason permalink
    February 12, 2016 11:07 am

    So why are more useless windmills being installed when they are even more useless in a storm. Surely the government should use the Met Office’s report as advice to curtail allowing these things to be built.

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