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Japan Gives Go Ahead To New Coal Fired Plants

February 25, 2016

By Paul Homewood   

 

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http://www.powerengineeringint.com/articles/2016/02/japan-re-embraces-coal-power.html

 

From PEI:

 

The Japanese government has decided to relax its opposition to coal-fired power.
The country’s environment ministry issued objections to five new coal-fired stations in 2015 but the industry ministry has persuaded them to accept voluntary steps by power companies to curb emissions.

Environmentalists say the change in attitude jeopardises Japan’s pledge to reduce CO2, however the ministry stated that it is monitoring stations to ensure enough is being done to meet carbon limits.
Japan is readying to open up its power retail market in April, and companies are rushing to build 43 coal-fired plants or 20.5 gigawatt of capacity in coming years, about a 50 per cent increase.
As part of the agreement, the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry is set to tighten its rules over coal-fired power stations from April 1, including issuing new non-binding requirements on the heat efficiency of new and existing plants to curb emissions.
"We will also monitor and check annually on progress. If we find the power industry cannot reach its goal, we will consider new measures," Environment Minister Tamayo Marukawa said after meeting with industry minister Motoo Hayashi to seal the agreement.
A group of 36 power companies, which supply 99 percent of the country’s electricity, have also formed a new body to take measures to trim emissions and meet the industry’s voluntary goal to cut emissions by 35 percent in 2030, compared with 2013.
Since the Fukushima incident the island nation has come to rely more and more on the cheaper alternative of coal-fired power.

 

Readers will recall that Japan’s INDC, which has been branded as inadequate by Carbon Tracker, only committed them to a reduce CO2 emissions by 10% from 1990 levels by 2030. Most of this reduction would be achieved by the return of nuclear to the power mix, while wind/solar would still only be contributing 8.7% by 2030.

4 Comments leave one →
  1. February 25, 2016 12:12 pm

    Reblogged this on Climatism.

  2. A C Osborn permalink
    February 25, 2016 2:51 pm

    Reality Bites, love it.
    Putting your nation before the UN, as it should, it is a pity the UK doesn’t do the same.

  3. February 25, 2016 4:22 pm

    Economic reality vs eco-green idealism.

    Nobody except cranks will accept a demotion in their lifestyle from First World to Second. All the proposed CO2 reduction is possible – and necessitates – a seriously downscaled life. Not just tweaking with bottle recycling pretentions. Putting the car on blocks, disconnecting air conditioning, turning off the heat come March 1 and running factories 3 days a week. Grounding aircraft and docking ships. Returning to a life of the 19th century, local, slow and spare. And even then, probably not sustainable for 6 billion people.

    A revolt will happen, one nation at a time when people come to see they are cutting calories to let others eat as they want.

  4. February 26, 2016 8:51 am

    Reblogged this on The GOLDEN RULE and commented:
    A matter of commonsense, a factor disappearing rapidly in our ways of life.
    CO2 is not a pollutant. Other atmospheric compounds are and they can be controlled.
    Nuclear, for Japan, is an obvious no-no, their nuclear radiation issues are horrendous and it is probably too late to recover from them.
    Nevertheless, making them worse, even potentially, would be a strange choice.
    Eventually, we need to replace fossil fuels as a power source, but not quickly.

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