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Winter Snow Extent Continues Rising Trend

March 7, 2017

By Paul Homewood

 

nhland_season1

http://climate.rutgers.edu/snowcover/chart_seasonal.php?ui_set=nhland&ui_season=1

 

 

Hottest year update!

 

NH snow cover this winter has been well above average, ranking 9th highest since 1967.

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18 Comments
  1. Joe Public permalink
    March 7, 2017 6:43 pm

    It’s missed SE England this year!

  2. March 7, 2017 7:31 pm

    An argument that can’t loose, if it snows more it’s the result of AGW. And if it doesn’t snow more, see ” our children just won’t know what snow is “.

  3. March 7, 2017 8:23 pm

    Reblogged this on Wolsten and commented:
    A classic not a lot of people know that

  4. March 7, 2017 9:18 pm

    Children won’t know what real science is any more.

    • John Palmer permalink
      March 7, 2017 9:21 pm

      Sadly, that’s already the case here in UK.

  5. Ian permalink
    March 7, 2017 9:35 pm

    In the absence of anywhere else I could think to report it, there was an interesting debate on fracking in the House of Lords this evening. The proposer got a shock. Worth checking out Hansard.

    Ian

  6. Ian permalink
    March 7, 2017 9:54 pm

    In the absence of somewhere else to report it, I just watched an interesting debate on fracking in the House of Lords. The proposer got a shock when the benefits of the technique were lauded by quite a few peers, including Lord Ridley. Worth checking Hansard.

    • Ian permalink
      March 7, 2017 9:58 pm

      Sorry for the stuttering, internet connection failed as I was posting the first time and I didn’t think it had got through. Still,gave me the chance to give h/t to Lord Ridley.

  7. Tom Dowter permalink
    March 8, 2017 12:16 am

    Normally when I see a noisy histogram like the one above with a trend attached, I tend to check how sensitive the trend is to different choices of start and end dates.

    I have done much the same with this one – except that I have used winter snow cover in the Northern hemisphere instead of extent.

    One of the checks that I have done in this instance is to examine the trend for every possible period of 25 years. The results are interesting:

    For each of the 12 periods between 1967-1991 and 1978-2002, the snow cover displays an increasing trend. However for each of the remaining 14 year periods between 1979-2003 and 1992-2016 the trend is downwards.

    This doesn’t quite match the so-called “hiatus”, but it is sufficiently close to be intriguing.

    • Tom Dowter permalink
      March 8, 2017 1:10 am

      Sorry, I have writeen upwards when I meant downwards and vice versa.

  8. Tom Dowter permalink
    March 8, 2017 1:17 am

    This is the corrected version:-

    Normally when I see a noisy histogram like the one above with a trend attached, I tend to check how sensitive the trend is to different choices of start and end dates.

    I have done much the same with this one – except that I have used winter snow cover in the Northern hemisphere instead of extent.

    One of the checks that I have done in this instance is to examine the trend for every possible period of 25 years. The results are interesting:

    For each of the 12 periods between 1967-1991 and 1978-2002, the snow cover displays an decreasing trend. However for each of the remaining 14 year periods between 1979-2003 and 1992-2016 the trend is upwards.

    This doesn’t quite match the so-called “hiatus”, but it is sufficiently close to be intriguing.

  9. John F. Hultquist permalink
    March 8, 2017 6:17 am

    Big snow in Washington State today. Roads closed. Accidents. Death.
    The snows get soft, deflate, harden.
    10 cm. at our house on top of a crusty surface that will support my weight.
    The amounts in the mountains will be known in the morning when the ski patrols get out.

  10. Peter MacFarlane permalink
    March 8, 2017 8:00 am

    It really doesn’t matter in the least what the facts are, about snow, rain, tornadoes, polar bears, or anything else.

    Every year will always be the hottest year evah, because it just is, and that’s that.

    (from the BBC big book of Science)

  11. CheshireRed permalink
    March 8, 2017 8:18 pm

    I have a few friends who’re into their skiing. (Not for me; dodgy knees!) Anyway, two lots of skiers, one lot of visitors and a family who live near Chamonix have ALL been snowed off the pistes or in their resort / villages, because of TOO MUCH snow. All in France, btw.

    So much for Dr David Viner’s prediction…..

  12. March 8, 2017 8:40 pm

    Reblogged this on Climate Collections.

  13. Sheri permalink
    March 12, 2017 3:09 pm

    The global warming crowd’s answer to this will be: “Just wait for spring snow results. It’s melting faster and faster and the snow cover drops too quickly and things warm up. It’s not the winter snow that counts, but the spring snow”. (Subject to revision if the spring snow does not behave as ordered.)

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