Skip to content

Electric Car Costs Must Not Fall On Bill Payers–GMB

April 8, 2018

By Paul Homewood

 

h/t HotScot

A timely reminder from one of the UK’s biggest trades unions:

 

image

GMB SAYS GOVERNMENT AND OFGEM MUST ENSURE COSTS OF MOTORWAY ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING POINTS DON’T FALL ON HOUSEHOLD BILLPAYERS

National Grid needs to be straight and stop using its support for an early ban on new petrol and diesel car sales as a Trojan horse for extra taxpayer cash to pay for ‘expensive’ and ‘difficult to co-ordinate’ new charging infrastructure says GMB.

GMB, the energy union, is calling for the Government and Ofgem to reassure the public that the costs of setting up electric vehicle charging points at motorway service stations across the country won’t be passed on to household billpayers.

National Grid recently said it would support the government bringing forward its 2040 ban on new petrol and diesel car sales by a decade. [1]

The company, which runs the UK’s national electricity network and wants to build superfast car charging points at motorway services, told MPs it could cope with the demands of an earlier surge in electric car numbers – but didn’t say who would pay for the new infrastructure.

National Grid has forecast up to 35 million pure electric vehicles will be on the roads by 2050.

That scenario sees peak demand from electric vehicles rising by 30 gigawatts — the equivalent of 10 Hinkley Point power stations — adding to a current peak demand of 61GW. [2]

A separate National Grid Report from March 2018 [3] says gas will be fundamental to any realistic future energy scenario and that it is not feasible to switch over to electric heating on the scale required to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 80 per cent of 1990 levels by the middle of this century.

The report says that a move to electric heating would require a seven fold increase in the capacity of the grid to 290 gigawatts, emphasising the future importance of gas and the need for our own independent gas supply.

For the 12 months from 7 March 2017, every one in 5.6 days was a low wind day (65 days in total) when the output of the installed and connected wind turbines in the UK produced less than 10% of their installed and connected capacity for more than half of the day.

For 341 days in the year, solar output was below 10% of installed capacity for more than half of the day. [4]

Justin Bowden, GMB National Secretary, said:

“When National Grid wraps up a warm welcome to the end of sales of new petrol and diesel cars by 2040 with vital upgrades to motorway service station electricity infrastructure, it is not being upfront.

“What National Grid fails to make clear is that as Ofgem guidelines stand, it could be household energy bill payers who are hit with the huge costs of installing sufficient electric vehicle (EV) charging points into all the country’s motorway service stations.

“National Grid needs to be straight and stop using its support for an early ban on new petrol and diesel car sales as a Trojan horse for extra taxpayer cash to pay for ‘expensive’ and ‘difficult to co-ordinate’ new charging infrastructure.

“When Grid says the more rapid roll out of EV’s ‘could be facilitated by the close alignment of the transmission and motorway networks’, what they really mean is with some extra cash.

“GMB is saying very loudly and very clearly to Goverment and Ofgem – make clear now that the costs of upgrading the electricity grid to Britain’s motorway service stations with sufficient electric vehicle charging points will not fall on household energy bill payers.”

http://www.gmb.org.uk/newsroom/electric-car-bill

20 Comments
  1. Gamecock permalink
    April 8, 2018 10:32 am

    “GMB is saying very loudly and very clearly to Goverment and Ofgem – make clear now that the costs of upgrading the electricity grid to Britain’s motorway service stations with sufficient electric vehicle charging points will not fall on household energy bill payers.”

    Yep. Make it clear. Then go on and do whatever you want to. The Present has no power over the Future.

  2. April 8, 2018 10:53 am

    Have just posted this on Facebook, under: “Read this if you want to avoid austerity”.
    Will probably get flak.

  3. Gerry, England permalink
    April 8, 2018 11:56 am

    Walking along Brighton sea front with the wind blowing flakes of global warming into my face, I saw a virtue signalling plugging in his Scalextric car and had a thought. What is to stop ‘kids’ going around and unplugging them at night so come morning you haven’t been charged up as you planned?

    • Bitter@twisted permalink
      April 8, 2018 3:45 pm

      Now there’s a thought:-)

    • J Martin permalink
      April 8, 2018 8:13 pm

      Aren’t these things locked in with your key or stay in till they’ve finished charging ?
      That’s a hell of an oversight.

  4. spetzer86 permalink
    April 8, 2018 12:31 pm

    Will they also post how much it’ll cost to generate the electricity these charging stations are going to need to keep cars, etc., moving on the roads? Seems like all these EV’s are going to require more electricity.

  5. April 8, 2018 12:38 pm

    “Electric Car Costs Must Not Fall On Bill Payers–GMB” Wanna bet?

  6. April 8, 2018 12:50 pm

    Maybe someone should tell the GMB the govt has no money of it’s own. It all comes from taxpayers one way or the other.

    • HotScot permalink
      April 8, 2018 9:24 pm

      Ted

      I rather thought that as well when I read it. Mind you, in the spirit of free enterprise, I would be happy to see shareholders shouldering the cost of the investment, assuming the public weren’t getting fleeced to provide subsidies.

      If charging stations across the country were a profitable enterprise, they wouldn’t need subsidies and the competition to provide them at the best value would be enthusiastic.

      But I suspect otherwise.

  7. April 8, 2018 2:54 pm

    One little nugget in the article was the contribution that all the solar panels in the UK make.

    For 341 days in the year, solar output was below 10% of installed capacity for more than half of the day. [4]

    As I understand it this means that solar panels only exceeded 10% of their rated output for 25 days a year.

    So for 341 days, they did effectively nothing and for 25 days a year, they managed to exceed 10% of their capacity.

    Chocolate teapot comes to mind.

    • Bitter@twisted permalink
      April 8, 2018 3:46 pm

      Much better to use fossil sunshine than the real thing.

    • Gamecock permalink
      April 8, 2018 10:12 pm

      Wind/solar is mystery energy. Maybe you’ll get it; maybe you won’t.

  8. mikewaite permalink
    April 8, 2018 5:34 pm

    “The report says that a move to electric heating would require a seven fold increase in the capacity of the grid to 290 gigawatts, ” and 80% of that must be from renewables according to the Govt .
    So where would 230GW come from on a day such as today, (perfect for trips out in the car), when the wind farms are providing just 0.2GW
    http://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk/

  9. keith permalink
    April 8, 2018 5:49 pm

    Don’t forget Gove said we only need 10,000 more windmills to meet EV electric needs. With stupid comments like that, what is the problem!!!!

    • HotScot permalink
      April 8, 2018 9:25 pm

      keith

      he ran out of fingers and toes, so asked an expert, who used everyone else’s fingers and toes.

  10. mikewaite permalink
    April 8, 2018 8:28 pm

    Why is it the GMB union that is asking awkward questions , not the BBC , C4 , any of the “quality” newspapers or any of our well financed University luminaries.
    I am not questioning the ability of their members to pose or indeed answer complex questions, but wonder why they raise doubts about this, when the history of union intervention has often, not always, been to increase public spending and taxation in general – and this programme of going all – electric at the same time has almost all – renewables looks like one enormous poll tax.

    • HotScot permalink
      April 8, 2018 9:36 pm

      mikewaite

      As a long standing capitalist, I value Unions. Not the ones of old who were as bad as their money wasting socialist politicians, but rather the new breed who seem to be more in touch with reality.

      With all the experience and information they have to hand, they could be a positive benefit to any growing business if brought in as advisers rather than considered adversaries.

      I believe there is a need for them to tackle genuinely predatory company’s who perceive employees as a route to profit via dreadful pay and conditions in order to remain competitive.

      Of this, I know. I work for G4S and there are few, more employee predatory businesses in the world. They are/were also supported by our PM’s husband, who is/was a shareholder.

  11. Europeanonion permalink
    April 9, 2018 8:03 am

    In olden times, when transport was provided by sailing ships, there would be the problem of leaving harbour when there were adverse winds or no wind. Ships could be trapped in the roads for days, which must have made waving goodbye rather tiresome. The thought of cars immobilised for days because of high pressure systems and no power generation plays on my sensibilities.

  12. Ian permalink
    April 10, 2018 9:02 am

    The GMB ought to talk to their Unison colleagues. At a time when hospital workers (and patients/visitors) are having to pay extortionate parking charges, councils are being castigated by HMG for not spending £4.5m allocated for installing EV charge points. A problem with priorities, it seems to me.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: