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OFWAT Blames Water Shortage On Global Warming!

July 16, 2018
tags:

By Paul Homewood

Some day, one of our hopeless quangocrats will resist the temptation to blame their failings on climate change. But I suspect we will be waiting a long time!

The latest to join the posse is the useless Rachel Fletcher of OFWAT.

From the Mail:

image

The days of using tap water for gardening and washing the car must end, the official watchdog warned yesterday.

Rachel Fletcher insisted families should switch to other sources, including recycled water from baths and showers and tanks that capture rainfall.

She said only a minority of homes had water butts and this would have to become the norm in future.

The idea of using treated drinking quality water to water our gardens and wash our cars in the 21st century is no longer considered appropriate (stock image)

The idea of using treated drinking quality water to water our gardens and wash our cars in the 21st century is no longer considered appropriate (stock image)

 

Miss Fletcher, who is the head of Ofwat, said pressure on supplies was growing because of climate change, population growth and the building of homes in drier areas.

‘We recognise the longer-term challenges,’ she told MPs.

‘We do as a sector need to think about transferring water from one region to another. And we have got to shift the frontier in the technology we are using in delivering water supplies.

The idea of using treated drinking quality water to water our gardens and wash our cars in the 21st century just doesn’t seem appropriate. As a regulator, it is something we will push the companies to innovate on.

‘We will work with government and other partners to do everything we can to make sure we have secure, affordable and an environmentally friendly approach to delivering future water supplies.’

Miss Fletcher said plans to build thousands of homes between Oxford and Cambridge could put impossible pressure on water supplies, making the case for a national grid.

The Commons environment committee also heard evidence from the head of the Environment Agency, Sir James Bevan. He said water leakage reduction targets set for the big suppliers needed to be much tougher.

Sir James added that climate change threatened future water supplies and he backed calls for new targets to ensure the amount of water lost through leakage from the mains should be lowered by 50 per cent.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5944131/Britons-told-stop-using-tap-water-gardening-car-washes-regulator-says-recycle-bathwater.html?ITO=1490

 

The drier area she is talking about is the South East. Below is the annual rainfall data from the Met Office:

 

 image

https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/climate/uk/summaries/datasets

 

Can anybody see the effect of climate change? Good, because neither can I!

 

OFWAT’s job is to regulate the water industry, so why is this silly woman not doing her job and making sure that water leaks are reduced, and proper investment in storage made?

 

Instead she wants to lecture us about how we run our lives. One is entitled to wonder what her own water footprint is.

Her predecessor was earning £160k pa in 2016, so I doubt if Rachel Fletcher is short of an odd bob or two!

image

 https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/water-services-regulation-authority-ofwat-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017

 

I somehow don’t see her living in a tiny two up two down, with a tiny patch of garden.

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38 Comments
  1. quaesoveritas permalink
    July 16, 2018 10:47 am

    “Miss Fletcher, who is the head of Ofwat, said pressure on supplies was growing because of climate change, population growth and the building of homes in drier areas.”

    Why do they always put “climate change” first in the list, even though it is probably the least significant, and the most difficult to prove?
    I would have thought that population growth and increased usage/wastage would be much more significant.

    • July 16, 2018 11:20 am

      “Why do they always put “climate change” first in the list, even though it is probably the least significant, and the most difficult to prove?”

      You just answered your own question.

      • Keith permalink
        July 16, 2018 11:26 am

        Yes, it is just to keep the climate scam up and going.

      • July 16, 2018 11:57 am

        I know, it was rhetorical 🙂

    • TinyCO2 permalink
      July 16, 2018 3:03 pm

      Well climate change is supposed to be our fault as westerners whereas population growth is their fault as migrants adding to demand. It’s not PC for it to be anyone’s fault but ours.

      It’s funny how mass immigration that is so good for our prosperity seems to mean us having less and less. Getting richer with a minus sign in front.

    • Rowland P permalink
      July 16, 2018 4:24 pm

      Net immigration for 2017 was 280,000 apparently. Well past time to raise the drawbridge as this country is not just full up but overflowing. The “sustainable” population is reckoned to be about 30 million but we are well past double that.

  2. Jeremy Taylor permalink
    July 16, 2018 10:50 am

    I refuse to use less water. I pay for all the water I use. The population has grown over the last 20 years and reservoir capacity should have increased as well. To blame people and global warming is ridiculous.

    >

    • Russ Wood permalink
      July 16, 2018 11:07 am

      Same thing in Cape Town, South Africa – population expanded by over 50%, water supply (under the control of the central government) grew by about 10%. And, to top it off, the Department of Water Affairs is one of the major corrupt sinks, with huge amounts of cash going missing, and planned water supplies never built because the previous minister wanted to have specific companies selected, even though they didn’t have the capability.

      • July 16, 2018 12:00 pm

        ” the Department of Water Affairs is one of the major corrupt sinks”
        I assume the pun was not intentional?

  3. Jeremy Taylor permalink
    July 16, 2018 10:51 am

    I refuse to use less water. I pay for all the water I use. The population has grown over the last 20 years and reservoir capacity should have increased as well. To blame people and global warming is ridiculous.

  4. July 16, 2018 10:58 am

    I am not on a meter and I use a lot of water.in the garden I sometimes take water from the river, but have lots of taps around the garden and several hoses. We have been told by the BBC weather man that there is plenty of water in the reservoirs in the SW, so on with the watering and gathering the huge crops brought on by the plentiful sunshine and CO2..

    • Bitter@twisted permalink
      July 16, 2018 11:20 am

      I live in the South East. Haven’t had any rain for over 6 weeks.
      I use the hose when and where necessary.
      Sod Offtwat and Ms Fletcher.

  5. Bloke down the pub permalink
    July 16, 2018 11:12 am

    I have a water butt, but that ran dry weeks ago with no appreciable rain to top it up. If they want people to re-cycle bath water, then they should’ve changed the building regs to require collection tanks are installed in new build houses, but that would be too easy for these numb-nuts. The next time some politician tries to convince you of the benefits of mass immigration, perhaps you should recall this post.

    • Bitter@twisted permalink
      July 16, 2018 11:18 am

      Burn it.
      It is most likely contaminated with Legionaire’s disease bacteria.
      See article in yesterday’s “Times”.

  6. Bitter@twisted permalink
    July 16, 2018 11:15 am

    Ms Fletcher, who is the airhead in charge of Offtwat, appears as clueless about reality as the MPs she was blathering too.
    That takes some doing. Those bozos voted for Barreness Worthless’s Climate Change wet dream.

  7. July 16, 2018 11:19 am

    Climate change is the all purpose excuse for bureaucrat failure. If it’s going to be drierwhy don’t they get more supplies and get more storage. Its England. It rains all the time.

  8. July 16, 2018 11:27 am

    Perhaps it is time to revisit that infamous article from the University of East Anglia where brilliant students promoted the idea of peeing in the morning shower to reduce water usage.

    I have never laughed so hard as I did over the replies from you folks. Someone even calculated the volume of the local reservoir and the amount of it which would be saved by not flushing the toilet first thing in the morning. Another wag wondered at the amount of water flooding over you while engaged in peeing instead of just showering. It was truly a feast of mirth.

    Paul, post that article again….PLEASE!!

    • Gerry, England permalink
      July 16, 2018 2:32 pm

      Best place to pee is on your compost heap as it helps it rot down. Not always convenient I admit.

      • Juliet 46 permalink
        July 16, 2018 6:01 pm

        Especially for the Ladies…

  9. Ben Vorlich permalink
    July 16, 2018 11:31 am

    Recycling bath water is interesting, many people now shower (on government advice to save water) in a shower cubicle where catching and storing used water isn’t that easy.

    When running water to get hot water for dishing washing I catch the cold from several metres of pipe in a bucket for plant watering later. Not enough of the family do this so I end up using more just for watering. Makes sense to me when water is metered, buckets can be emptied into the water butt, which isn’t full during dry periods, for use later. But rather than blaming the public perhaps water companies could invest in their infrastructure, and wasn’t that one one of the promises at privatisation – more investment?

    • Gerry, England permalink
      July 16, 2018 2:34 pm

      And along in the background as is ever the case is the EU and the Water Directive that made water a finite resource. The recent Liberal government cancelled planned reservoirs in the South-East so don’t blame the water companies.

    • Jack Broughton permalink
      July 16, 2018 3:45 pm

      This makes great sense as the hot storage in pipework wastes a few gallons per day. Will put this to the boss and see what she says!

  10. Simon permalink
    July 16, 2018 11:46 am

    The usual group think nonsense from one of our virtuous enlightened establishment figures. I would ask her two questions;

    1) How many new reservoirs have been constructed in England in the last five years?
    2) How many are planned for the next five years?

  11. MrGrimNasty permalink
    July 16, 2018 11:52 am

    Water companies won’t be happy. The water sprinkled on gardens is their most profitable (as they still charge for waste water disposal, unless you have a separate meter for the garden tap – hardly anyone does). e.g. £1.37m3 for supply, and £2.39m3 for waste-water which is assumed to be 92.5% of supply volume. If garden use is banned, charges will go up for the supply of much less water so that profitability is maintained. More shrink-flation.

    • David A permalink
      July 23, 2018 12:12 pm

      The large PPM CO2 increase saves more water then these trough feeders ever will! The 125 ppm increase in CO2 saves about 15 to 20 percent of the water AND land required to grow the same amount of food in a 280 PPM CO2 world.

  12. July 16, 2018 12:11 pm

    I believe that any water shortages in the UK are due to lack of processing/transmission capacity due to elevated demand, rather than to low reservoirs, which are healthy due to the heavy winter/spring rain and snowfall.

    I wonder if climate change can be blamed for wind droughts? What fun that would be, but taboo on the BBC of course.

  13. bobn permalink
    July 16, 2018 12:52 pm

    Why are so many ignorant idiots employed in quangos?
    She says
    ‘We do as a sector need to think about transferring water from one region to another.’
    Well the Victorians thought about that, and designed a a grid to do that. However they didnt need to build it due to abundant local water in 1860.

    ‘Miss Fletcher said plans to build thousands of homes …. making the case for a national grid.’
    Well duuuhhh. The case for a National grid has been obvious for 50years. The State owned water system didnt invest and now the State protects the private monopolies so they dont have to invest.
    Oftwat is just another incompetent Govt parasite that is staffed by brain-dead morons.
    Connect the rivers and canals and get some of the plentiful welsh water to england. Maybe even invest in catching some of that rain and storing it behind Dams! there’s a novel idea!

  14. July 16, 2018 12:55 pm

    Water companies are beginning to harness rainwater as a non-potable supply to houses on new developments to use for toilet flushing, car washing & garden use. However Rachel Fletcher does not respond to me for a discussion on establishing a system to do the same for the existing housing stock. It seems to be easier to say words than actually do anything!

  15. Joe Public permalink
    July 16, 2018 1:13 pm

    We’re doomed.

    The Graun places its bets on both outcomes.

    ‘UK braces for floods and water shortages as temperatures rise”

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/mar/05/britain-braces-for-floods-and-water-shortages-as-temperatures-rise

    NB the ” .. as temperatures rise” bit refers to “Despite forecasts of a high of 11C (52F) in London on Monday, .. ” 5th March!

  16. Tony Budd permalink
    July 16, 2018 1:55 pm

    Nobody “earns” £160k – they might be paid that much, but that’s different.

  17. July 16, 2018 2:11 pm

    ‘We do as a sector need to think about transferring water from one region to another.’

    Much of Manchester’s water supply is piped in from the Lake district nearly 100 miles away. This system is a century old. All we can think of is degrading the service.
    http://hidden-manchester.org.uk/waterways/thirlmere-aqueduct.html

  18. jasg permalink
    July 16, 2018 2:14 pm

    Whether its too wet or too dry it’s global warming wot dunnit. Always a convenient excuse for crappy maintenance of our infrastructure. In Cumbria we are told there is plenty water in the reservoirs but the size of the pipes going down the street is too small. Seems like another self-regulating problem to me. This is how supply and demand works. If folk are using too much; just prevent them from having it. Works better than appealing to our civic duty!

  19. Gerry, England permalink
    July 16, 2018 2:43 pm

    Sutton & East Surrey Water will fit a meter to your property when their is a change of ownership. So most of my longstanding neighbours are not metered but I am. And yes, you get royally shafted by the waste water company if you use any water that is not sent to the drains as you still pay as if it was. They would charge me more if they took away surface water as well.

  20. Dave Ward permalink
    July 16, 2018 3:54 pm

    “The idea of using treated drinking quality water to water our gardens and wash our cars in the 21st century just doesn’t seem appropriate”

    Well what does Ms Fletcher consider as an alternative? Provide less purified water to homes, and expect them to install extra equipment to make it safe to drink and wash with? Of course that would need electricity to run it… Why not dig up the entire country and put in a duplicate set of pipes – those of us who remember the disruption when cable TV/phone lines where installed won’t be very pleased at that possibility.

    Tell you what – how about making the homeowner responsible for all final treatment and back-up for water and other (increasingly erratic) services. Every home will need large storage tanks for gas and non-potable water, plus a battery bank and inverter/charger to cover for grid outages. And while you’re at it, do away with centralised sewage disposal, and have “Eco Friendly” reed bed purification systems and composting toilets at each property as well. That should save the utilities a fortune!

    Perhaps I’m dreaming, or maybe just suffering from heat stroke….

  21. Athelstan permalink
    July 16, 2018 4:10 pm

    O/T.

    A revelation in the SH, holy jumping Joseph and thrice hallelujah!!

    Turnbull weighs coal fix for energy wars

    Simon Benson and Ben Packham, The Australian

    A proposal for the federal government to financially guarantee the construction and operation of new dispatchable power generation, which could include clean coal-fired plants, is expected to be taken to cabinet with the backing of the Prime Minister.

    Malcolm Turnbull yesterday confirmed he would seriously consider the key recommendation of a report by the competition watchdog to underwrite and potentially subsidise new “firm” and cheap power generation for industrial and commercial users.

    Signalling a possible end to the energy wars within the Coalition partyroom, the recommendation was immediately endorsed by ­Nationals MPs, who have interpreted it as a green light for government to intervene in supporting the future of coal generation.

    h/t RobK

    The government wouldn’t need to buy new coal plants if our market wasn’t so screwed in the first place. But it is screwed, so “OK”. Better would be for the government to get out of the market, stop trying to use our electricity grid as a Global Climate Controller, stop forcing consumers to buy green electrons, stop trying to pick-the-winners in the tech game, stop big energy groups from owning every kind of generator and game the bidding system, stop building transmission lines to Kalamazoo and stop employing green activists to run our national energy market.

    Ah God someone said it and it’s SO good, I going to reiterate and in bold, listen up UK, you greenblob/ westminster tosserati:

    The government wouldn’t need to buy new coal plants if our market wasn’t so screwed in the first place. But it is screwed, so “OK”. Better would be for the government to get out of the market, stop trying to use our electricity grid as a Global Climate Controller, stop forcing consumers to buy green electrons, stop trying to pick-the-winners in the tech game, stop big energy groups from owning every kind of generator and game the bidding system, stop building transmission lines to Kalamazoo and stop employing green activists to run our national energy market.

  22. Bill permalink
    July 16, 2018 4:51 pm

    Unless I’m mistaken there was a plan to create a water grid in the 60’s and 70’s, in the days when national infrastructure was considered important ( I remember the national electrical supply grid being built as well). This, I believe was the reason why kielder reservoir was created. The idea was to pipe water to the SE which has low rainfall. I live in North Norfolk, we have less rainfall than Ethiopia (at least thats what my plumber told me, he’s married to an Ethiopian lady). Locally we have a network of reservoirs for water hungry crops.

    This was the same time as north sea gas came on line, another huge national undertaking. These completed projects still provide the backbone of our comfortable existence today. Renewables are a symptom of the ‘i’ world we live in. People seem to forget that these long established background facilities are essential to our wellbeing. ‘Renewables’ cannot and will never compete.

  23. It doesn't add up... permalink
    July 16, 2018 10:31 pm

    Needless to say our good friend NIC has something to say about water:

    https://www.nic.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/NIC-Preparing-for-a-Drier-Future-26-April-2018.pdf

    Halve leakage, curtail domestic demand by 15% and build some new infrastructure, each contributing a third towards a 4bn litre/day target. Does this differ from OFWAT? Of course, like all NIC’s work, it seems they avoid showing their workings, and merely present their conclusions.

  24. July 22, 2018 11:39 pm

    Water butts are great for watering plants in wet-weather – when the plants will probably survive OK anyway. But when dry weather strikes, they don’t last very long and soon run out.

    In wet weather they are constantly overflowing and in dry weather they are mostly empty. A surprisingly large tank is needed for a successful water butt.

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