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Strong Tornadoes Less Common In US Now

October 23, 2018
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By Paul Homewood

 

 U.S. Annual Tornado Trends

https://www.spc.noaa.gov/wcm/#data

 

Whenever anybody wheels out their list of extreme weather events for this year, remind them about US tornadoes.

Not only is this year proving to be one of the quietist in recent years, the number of strong tornadoes is currently on track to be the lowest on record.

image

https://twitter.com/Mark_J_Perry/status/1054732826145382400

 

Indeed according to my data, there have only been 9 EF-3+ this year (and not 10 as quoted). All of these have been EF-3s, meaning no EF-4s and EF-5s. There has not been a year without any of those more violent tornadoes since reliable records began in 1970.

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16 Comments
  1. freeholddave permalink
    October 24, 2018 1:20 am

    Do you have the Bill Nye video explaining how violent tornadoes are connected with global warming?

    • October 24, 2018 2:22 pm

      You mean the Bill Nye with a degree in mechanical engineering from Cornell University who passes himself off as a scientist? That fake?

      • Gamecock permalink
        October 24, 2018 10:36 pm

        Nye has an article in NatGeo Magazine this month. So he must be a scientist.

      • October 25, 2018 1:10 pm

        Gamecock are you from SC?
        As to National Geographic. Beginning with my grandparents and continuing with my parents, I have an almost complete set back to 1915. My late parents gave my 2 brothers and myself lifetime memberships. When I worked in the US National Herbarium, Botany Dept., Smithsonian Institution in DC, I fact checked botanical articles for them. I am even credited in the book on The Appalachian Trail they did. This was in the ’70’s.

        My, how the mighty NGS has fallen. Several years ago I wrote and rescinded my membership. At this point, I would consider Bill Nye a perfect fit. They ceased to be scientific a long time ago. Many of their articles do not fit their stated objective and are more sociology than science or geography.

      • Gerry, England permalink
        October 25, 2018 1:47 pm

        A total embarrassment to mechanical engineers who should be connected to reality or what they design will fail.

  2. October 24, 2018 1:41 am

    Reblogged this on Climate Collections.

  3. Bitter@twisted permalink
    October 24, 2018 8:12 am

    It’s worse than we thought😧

  4. RAH permalink
    October 24, 2018 2:44 pm

    There was an EF-4 reported in Manitoba, Canada this year. https://weather.com/storms/tornado/news/2018-08-06-north-america-first-ef4-tornado-in-canada-not-united-states

    • October 24, 2018 3:08 pm

      But the last time I checked.that wasn’t the USA 😉

      • RAH permalink
        October 24, 2018 4:03 pm

        Of course not Mr. obvious! NOAA Storm prediction center covers all of N. America.

        I’m not arguing that the tornado in the US and N. America in general is not down nor that the number of severe storms (EF-3 and higher) are not way down. Major tornadoes are rarer up in Canada though and thus should be noted.

        EF-0 and 1 tornadoes have made up a disproportionate number in the counts for many years now. There were only three EF-4 tornadoes and eighteen EF 3s reported in the US in 2015 out of a total count of 1,257.

        This difference, at least in some part, has to be due to more tornadoes as a whole being reported. EF 0s and 1s are being reported now that would have not been even 10 years ago.

        And that makes the decrease in the over all counts for the years since the above average year of 2008 even more astounding. A real black eye for the alarmists who claimed more extreme weather would result from “climate change”.

      • October 24, 2018 5:32 pm

        However, the SPC’s database only includes US tornadoes

  5. John F. Hultquist permalink
    October 24, 2018 5:08 pm

    Hope you were touching wood (or tapping your head) as you posted this article.
    Here we say “knocking on wood.”
    Another of my favorite English sites: http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-tou1.htm

  6. David James Styles permalink
    October 25, 2018 9:13 am

    OT – The BBC have an article up on the ‘Reality Check’ of comparative energy production
    (or is this sale) costs https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45881551

  7. Chris Lynch permalink
    October 25, 2018 5:23 pm

    On a totally different issue I wonder if anyone could help me resolve an argument with a pro CAGW friend of mine. He said the appearance of the little egret in Ireland in recent years is “proof” that CAGW is dramatically warming the climate. I said that the egret is merely re colonising and was previously common here. I know I saw some authority on it and can’t find it – could anyone point me in the right direction?

    • dave permalink
      October 25, 2018 6:56 pm

      Wikipedia states that it was common in the 19th century in north-western Europe but was wiped out here by hunting for its feathers. It has been protected since 1950 and its range has been extending since from the south. It was regarded as inevitable that it would extend to England and Ireland once a large breeding population became established in Normandy thirty years ago. They are great flyers. They can turn up almost anywhere but do not like to stay for the winter usually.

      It is definitely a case of RE-colonizing therefore, although I doubt that anybody was counting them obsessively back in the 19th century. Whether these birds find it more congenial now than then is a silly question and a conjecture typical of idiot warmists.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_egret

  8. dave permalink
    October 25, 2018 9:17 pm

    Back in 1975, “the scientists” were coming up with nutzoid theories to explain the sixforld INCREASE in tornadoes that had occurred in the preceding forty years. One explanation was that Americans drove on the right:

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/232788247_Effect_of_vorticity_pollution_by_motor_vehicles_on_tornadoes

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