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Climate Proof Your Home–Says Daily Mail

February 17, 2019

By Paul Homewood

 

h/t Patsy Lacey

 

It is time this nonsense was ended for once and for all.

image

Talking about the weather may be a long-standing British tradition, but designing our homes to suit the climate has only recently become commonplace.

The idea of ‘climate-proofing’ our homes has now become a priority for some, and with good reason.

Quite apart from short-term weather threats, with temperatures frequently going from freezing to double figures in a matter of days, there is a long-term need for action, too.

A report compiled by scientists and the Met Office, launched by Environment Secretary Michael Gove in November, says global warming might see average summer temperatures increase by 5.4c and winter norms rise 4.2c by 2070.

The country is likely to see more extreme weather in the form of wet winters, flooding and summer heatwaves — and even wildfires.

At the same time, there’s an energy crisis brewing. Back in 2016, the Institute of Mechanical Engineers forecast that as soon as 2025, the demand for electricity could outstrip its supply by as much as 40 per cent chiefly because of the country’s growing population.

So what can be done in our homes — now and in the future — to save energy, push down ever-increasing fuel bills, and engineer more eco-friendly long-term designs?

EASY SOLUTIONS

‘Most households could save hundreds a year and improve their green credentials with simple measures’, insists Stephen Naughtie, a London-based domestic energy consultant.

He suggests households irrigate gardens from a water butt: ‘It costs £50 but if you’re on a water meter, you could save £100 in just one hot summer.’

In addition, Naughtie says sealing draughts, insulating the loft and moving sofas away from radiators all make homes warmer without even turning the heating up.

Meanwhile a low-flow shower and ultra-low flush toilet can save a combined total of up to 15,000 litres of water per person per year. Water-efficient washing machines could save 5,000 litres of water annually per person. All of these could save up to £160 per year.

Solar shading in the form of shutters, curtains or reflective blinds over windows is another way to prevent homes overheating in the sun and so reducing the need for air conditioning.

LAWNED ROOFS

In the long-term more fundamental changes to our homes may be needed to fight climate change and energy shortages.

Hillarys, an interior design and house fittings company, says there are many big changes that house design is going through to prepare for global warming.

Tara Hall, spokesperson for Hillarys, says: ‘We’ve looked at the practical and often simple measures that all UK homeowners can start making now to ensure their homes are able to withstand more extreme weather conditions.’

These include ‘lawned’ green roofs which absorb sunshine and reduce the temperature in summer while aiding thermal efficiency in winter by helping contain heat inside.

LOOK TO FUTURE

Harvesting rain water and passive cooling — the strategic placing of windows, doors and walls to keep spaces cool in summer and warm in winter — are also becoming increasingly common in new homes.

The Unique Property Group is designing homes at Cricklewood in North London to be 35 per cent more energy-efficient than planning requirements. It’s building them in a factory then transporting in sections them to the site.

 

 

‘The modules can be specially wrapped within the factory to provide a high grade thermal fabric … to get close to zero emissions,’ explains Unique’s managing director, Sonny Gowans.

Village Makers — has a 51-home scheme at Great Oakley in Essex, where every property will have triple glazing plus solar panels and insulation that is so effective that little ‘switch on’ heating will be required. The stuff of science fiction? Not any more.

A UN report warns that the first effects of global warming on property may be felt in just 12 years so any action we take now could pay dividends quicker than we imagine.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/property/article-6708573/Climate-proof-home-youre-ready-Britains-wild-weather.html

 

 

It must be obvious to anybody with half a braincell that our summers are not going to 5.4C hotter by 2070, nor that winters will be 4.2 warmer.

England Mean temperature - Summer

England Mean temperature - Winter

 

Nor are winters getting any wetter, or summers drier:

England Rainfall - Winter

England Rainfall - Summer

 

My dad had a water butt in our house in the 1960s, but it was not because of global warming. We also had curtains!

What saving water, sealing drafts and insulating lofts has to do with climate change, heaven knows.

Instead of repeating UN warnings that the first effects of global warming on property may be felt in just 12 years, why does not the Mail give its readers the real facts for a change, and help expose the lies?

As for Michael Gove, shouldn’t he be more worried about statements like this, than fake UN pronouncements?

At the same time, there’s an energy crisis brewing. Back in 2016, the Institute of Mechanical Engineers forecast that as soon as 2025, the demand for electricity could outstrip its supply by as much as 40 per cent chiefly because of the country’s growing population.

37 Comments
  1. Frank permalink
    February 17, 2019 2:27 pm

    “At the same time, there’s an energy crisis brewing. Back in 2016, the Institute of Mechanical Engineers forecast that as soon as 2025, the demand for electricity could outstrip its supply by as much as 40 per cent chiefly because of the country’s growing population.”

    Stop letting in Migrants that breed like rats if you are so concerned about electric use outstripping demand because of over population in the future….Fake news from people that speak from two sides of their mouths.

    • HotScot permalink
      February 17, 2019 2:42 pm

      How about just ditching windfarms and concentrate on building gas fired power stations using fracked gas to fuel them. We can deal with the migrant issue quite easily, but not without sufficient cheap energy in the first place.

      • Gerry, England permalink
        February 17, 2019 3:20 pm

        If we don’t kick the moaners out of the way and get fracking, gas won’t be a particularly good option as the demand for it is rising fast. Coal would be a better option.

      • Robert Jones permalink
        February 17, 2019 4:35 pm

        Excellent suggestions, but we also need Small Modular Reactors in every major population centre in addition to fracked fuel. Then we might be able to talk about energy security and even save money by cancelling the contracts for all those diesel generators.

    • Curious George permalink
      February 17, 2019 3:44 pm

      Don’t trust engineers. Ever. Only the BBC and the UN are trustworthy.

  2. Broadlands permalink
    February 17, 2019 2:40 pm

    “A UN report warns that the first effects of global warming on property may be felt in just 12 years”? And we thought that timeline was from the leaders of the “New Green Deal”. These highly trained US legislators have plans to stop it. Worry not. The “science is settled”.

    • Curious George permalink
      February 17, 2019 3:46 pm

      Of course, this can’t be a conspiracy.

    • spetzer86 permalink
      February 17, 2019 3:46 pm

      No, I think AOC said we’re all going to be dead in 12 years. Maybe it’ll only hurt for a little bit? If we’re heading toward a civil war, I’m glad the other side hates guns.

      • It doesn't add up... permalink
        February 17, 2019 10:22 pm

        I assume she read about that asteroid that is due to return to near earth trajectory in 2030. But someone should tell her – NASA think it won’t hit by a few million miles.

    • bobn permalink
      February 17, 2019 4:05 pm

      But I read their report 20yrs ago that said we’d feel the effects in 12 yrs! Strange how with every passing year its still ‘in another 12 years’. Of course they promised the ice would all have melted at the Nth Pole by 2014 – i expect thats now put on a rolling 12yr schedule.
      In the year 2121 I can see the headline ‘ climate change will take effect in 12yrs time’.

  3. February 17, 2019 2:47 pm

    So who is going to mow my green roof please??

    • Colin Brooks permalink
      February 17, 2019 2:48 pm

      Colin Brooks

    • Gerry, England permalink
      February 17, 2019 3:18 pm

      The new Flymo Hover Drone mower perhaps, just don’t stand under it.

    • John F. Hultquist permalink
      February 17, 2019 4:49 pm

      Mow your roof for a fee — I’m going to fund “Rent-a-Sheep”, or you can buy one, have it clip the grass (if that’s what you plant) [you could do Blueberries, Weed, or anything], and when the sheep is done with its job, make lamb chops, and a coat.

  4. Bitter@twisted permalink
    February 17, 2019 2:58 pm

    Easy solutions:
    Stop immigration.
    Get fracking.
    Stop “investing” in “unreliables”
    Ditch zero emissions cars.
    There, sorted!

  5. A C Osborn permalink
    February 17, 2019 3:28 pm

    I have no problem with them building “more Efficient” homes as long as they do not turn out to have Sick Building Syndrom.
    Houses and people need Ventilation, if you don’t get decent air turnover you will soon have problems.
    as for the Forecasts, we know it is all Fear Mongering and it won’t stop or even slow down any time soon.

    • Derek Buxton permalink
      February 18, 2019 10:29 am

      You think Gove has any idea of what total insulation would have? We would not have to worry about CO2, but only CO, kill the population in one fell but stupid move!

  6. February 17, 2019 3:41 pm

    I’ve climate-proofed my home with a generator and a large log store. Roll on warmer weather I say.

  7. NeilC permalink
    February 17, 2019 3:52 pm

    “A report compiled by scientists and the Met Office, launched by Environment Secretary Michael Gove in November, says global warming might see average summer temperatures increase by 5.4c and winter norms rise 4.2c by 2070.”

    Are the writers of this article alluding that the Met Office don’t have scientists? I can go along with that!

    The met office (lowered the case, they don’t deserve capitals), can’t forecast accurately 42 days ahead, never mind 42 years. – Utter C**P

  8. bobn permalink
    February 17, 2019 4:08 pm

    Nothing new here. However it does make sense to build and insulate well, but only ‘to save energy, push down ever-increasing fuel bills,’ No other reason.

  9. Joe Public permalink
    February 17, 2019 4:15 pm

    “Stephen Naughtie, a London-based domestic energy consultant … suggests households irrigate gardens from a water butt: ‘It costs £50 but if you’re on a water meter, you could save £100 in just one hot summer.’ ”

    Thames Water’s charges for 2018/19: the volume charge for water is 129.54 pence per cubic metre, and for wastewater it’s 82.61p/m^3. i.e. ~£2.12/m^3

    A water butt holds approx 250 litres, so in just one hot summer to save £100, the butt would need refilling approx 188 times – twice a day.

    And if it’s a ‘hot’ summer, there’ll be a shortage of rain! What a Naughtie dipstick.

  10. Green Sand permalink
    February 17, 2019 4:16 pm

    We need to get politics out of our energy supply!

    ‘Green taxes, smart meters, profit margins: the extras adding £550 to your energy bill ‘

    “Those who thought household energy bills had been reined in by the Government’s price cap were proved wrong last week when half of the “Big Six” suppliers hiked their prices again.

    Npower, EDF and E.On implemented the increases after Ofgem, the regulator, announced it was raising the ceiling on bills by £118, little over a month after this limit was enforced.

    The increase outstripped industry predictions despite being in line with the rise in the wholesale cost of providing energy – the amount suppliers pay to procure the power that keeps your lights on. Yet the actual cost of generating the energy makes up just 35pc of your bill.

    Telegraph Money can reveal the average household pays as much as £550 a year in operational costs, as well as £150 for green levies.

    Energy bills are currently capped at £1,137 a year for an average user on certain tariffs. Wholesale energy accounts for just £412 of this. The wholesale price is affected by factors including the cost of oil and geopolitical tensions, but it has frequently risen in recent years…..”

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/bills-and-utilities/gas-electric/green-taxes-smart-meters-profit-margins-extras-adding-550-energy/

  11. February 17, 2019 4:47 pm

    I reread sections to see if this was a very old article. A bit west of the UK we were doing this stuff over 40 years ago, not for climate change but for energy efficiency. I’ve done it in New Orleans, Michigan and, to a minor extent, in Virginia. I think I’ve covered more than the projected differences in temperature and survived. I’ve heard this so often over the years there can can only be one house in the US that hasn’t been insulated, weatherstripped, caulked, sealed, had the windows insulated (remember 3M film?) and all the other energy saving techniques. All this is recycled in the name of climate?

    I did learn a new term, water but. Over hear they are called rain barrels. They’ve been in use for 300 or so years. I have one because they are green, cute and my wife and daughter wanted one. And, as Joe Public so aptly calculated, to save that amount of money you would have to fill it twice a day. But if you filled a rain barrel twice a day, you wouldn’t need the water, you would need an improved drainage system.

    • John F. Hultquist permalink
      February 17, 2019 4:57 pm

      A few places in the USA, the government claims rain water is not yours for the taking, and rain barrels are not allowed. [Ex: needed to recharge the ground-water of an island; others]

      • February 17, 2019 5:05 pm

        Yep. But just think how Green(e) you can feel in those places where you can plug in a 50-gallon barrel and a soaker hose. In my case, my daughter bought the barrel, my wife pointed to a corner of the house and said there. I said yes ma’am and done what I was told.

  12. George Lawson permalink
    February 17, 2019 5:47 pm

    “As for Michael Gove, shouldn’t he be more worried about statements like this, than fake UN pronouncements”

    He should be sorting out his climate change department looking into the illegal payments made to Lord Deben. Why hasn’t he sacked him by now, or at least made a statement on why his lordship was paid £600,000 from the climate change industry?

  13. Sheri permalink
    February 17, 2019 7:19 pm

    I really question how all these “simple things”, even taken altogether, can make a big enough difference to save the planet from what is stated to be imminent doom. To me, this says we are just a little bitty bit over what would be considered “sustainable” (whatever that means) and it is NOT a crisis.

    While I don’t do a lot of the things listed, I do have insulating curtains (the down side of which is condensation on the windows behind the curtain in winter, requiring wiping with a towel) that I use, southern windows, low flush toilet (not ultra low, however), insulated house, etc. So I guess by these standards I’m fully climate ready. Actually, I’m just very cognizant of my energy usage and the weather in my area and deal with it in a rational way. Who knew that just doing what made sense was all it took. Wait… you say there’s more……

  14. M E permalink
    February 17, 2019 7:22 pm

    Temperatures vary daily from cold to hot in parts of New Zealand , where insulating the loft glass fibre batts is recommended . These are available at stores which sell tools and appliances. Most post earthquake repairs have double glazing and insulation in the walls too, because the original houses were uninsulated at a time of cheap coal fires. The advice cited in the article is recycling of information common to all new construction here.

  15. jack broughton permalink
    February 17, 2019 7:30 pm

    Maybe if we were all given subsidies to install air conditioning we could beat the terrifying and imminent threat (unmentioned death risks too) and also avoid constraint payments as A/C could be on a load-shedding basis. Might have used A/C two days during last years great summer… but if the Mail says so…..!

  16. February 17, 2019 8:57 pm

    Paul, typo “water but in our house”
    “water butt at our house”

  17. February 17, 2019 10:25 pm

    These include ‘lawned’ green roofs which absorb sunshine

    On a 40 degree slope? No. Anyway, where would the solar panels go?

  18. martinbrumby permalink
    February 17, 2019 11:38 pm

    I love ‘ultra low flush toilets’.
    They are the ones that you have to flush three times to get rid of a normal turd.
    Like the super duper extra low water using dishwasher, where you need to rinse all the pots before putting them in the washer to delay having to strip out and unblock the spray rotors.
    As for Michael Gove, he is a Greenie nitwit.
    It is time to re-introduce the stocks, together with a good supply of rotten cabbage and a few plastic drinking straws.

    • February 18, 2019 7:51 am

      So true. We have a low flush toilet and it does indeed often require two or three flushes, especially if you eat heathy food and your stools are solid. Low flush toilets work best if you have a an unhealthy diet and are suffering from Diarrhoea. I speak from experience, a few days of eating hot curries and alcohol and the toilet then works just fine 😉

      We often now leave a large plastic bucket in the bathroom so we can fill it with water from the bath taps. A full bucket of water down the toilet is far quicker and uses less water than relying on the toilets cistern. Especially true in our case because not only is ours a low flush toilet it also has one of those annoying ‘silent fill’ devices that take FOREVER to fill up. So if you need to flush two or three times it can take 10 mins of your life just to flush the loo…..

      • A C Osborn permalink
        February 18, 2019 12:50 pm

        It is not just your Toilet that they do not keep clean, they result in a lot more blockages in the Sewage systems as well if you don’t use your “extra” flushes.

  19. saparonia permalink
    February 19, 2019 10:38 pm

    save aluminium, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IV3lArO0_0U

  20. Roberto permalink
    February 20, 2019 12:08 am

    We are told to cut back water to get us ready for the drought days.

    So riddle me this: If we are cutting back to the max now, only doing a flush and shower once a week (for example), and then the drought hits, what happens now? Everybody cuts it back by half? To what?

    This nonsense is inherently backwards.

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