Skip to content

Victoria Falls Back To Normal

April 23, 2020

By Paul Homewood

h/t Dennis Ambler

 

Remember the BBC’s fake news last November?

 

 image

image

 

 

Turns out it was not CLIMATE CHANGE, but WEATHER!

 

image

After photos from Victoria Falls amid its dry season caused great concern in December, the magnificent falls are stronger than ever.

Victoria Falls, located at the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe on the Zambezi River, is not only one of the seven wonders of the world and classified as the biggest waterfall in the world, but it is also a tourist destination that allows the economies of both African countries to thrive.

The Kololo tribe, which resided in the area in the 1800s, named the falls "Mosi-oa-Tunya," meaning "the smoke that thunders." Both the indigenous name and the name Victoria Falls, given by Scottish explorer David Livingstone, are recognized officially.

AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Jim Andrews said the climate of the upper Zambezi River watershed is tropical, seasonal and continental, with "sharply distinct" wet and dry seasons. ….

Trevor Lane, a conservationist that works for Bhejane Trust, lives in Victoria Falls. 

He made clear that while people may be concerned for the flow of the falls from the pictures of the dry season, the water is not going anywhere any time soon.

"The falls [have] been like this for hundreds of years," Lane said. "It’s almost like the river in rebellion has come down in this mess of floods this year to show that it’s not going to dry up."

https://www.accuweather.com/en/severe-weather/victoria-falls-thunders-again-after-stark-dry-season-photos/720151

12 Comments
  1. MrGrimNasty permalink
    April 23, 2020 7:55 pm

    That really was one of the worst bits of fake climate news of recent times, and that’s saying something.

    UK weather – today was probably the warmest day we are likely to get in this very mild April, and 24C seems to have been the peak, so ‘low’ it is extremely unlikely a dubious claim to an April max.T record will crawl out the woodwork. Thankfully. Mean CET top 3+ still on, though.

  2. Broadlands permalink
    April 23, 2020 8:35 pm

    What should dry up are the constant gloom and doom predictions made by constant adjustments to the data and to the models themselves. Even a clock is right twice a day. Are they even that good?

  3. April 23, 2020 10:52 pm

    Climate Craziness damaging local economies, the Great Barrier Reef ‘dying’ is another example.

    • Graeme No.3 permalink
      April 24, 2020 12:45 am

      @I_am_not_a_robot

      But it was due to die before December 1971; and has been reported dying just about everytime that funds are being handed out.

  4. Coeur de Lion permalink
    April 24, 2020 9:23 am

    Off thread but U.K. electricity right now is just under 3 per cent wind and that’s on v low demand.

    • Stonyground permalink
      April 24, 2020 12:24 pm

      Went for a longish bike ride this morning, it was very still when I set off. Lots of turbines out our way, either not turning or turning very slowly. A slight breeze gradually rose and a few more started up but I don’t suppose that they were producing much electricity.

      • Bertie permalink
        April 24, 2020 6:52 pm

        Their slow turning was actually using power from the fossil-fuelled grid.

  5. April 24, 2020 10:48 am

    Quick, wheel out another fake scare to divert attention.

  6. April 24, 2020 11:57 am

    Africa has dry seasons, followed by wet seasons, followed by dry seasons, followed by…….well, you get the picture.

    Forests in these regions are known as “Rain Green Deciduous Forests.” The deciduous forests across most of the Northern Hemisphere are governed by the summer and winter temperatures. The forests of the Southern Hemisphere are governed by the wet and dry seasons rather than temperature.

  7. C Lynch permalink
    April 24, 2020 12:55 pm

    How dare Nature contradict the Narrative. I won’t be holding my breath for a BBC special on this development.

  8. Dave Cowdell permalink
    April 24, 2020 5:54 pm

    Well Zimbabwe has six months of dry season and six months of wet. In 1975.ish whilst working on several dams in Rhodesia it was noted that there were 4 one thousand year floods.

  9. Russ Wood permalink
    April 26, 2020 3:27 pm

    And down in South Africa (the biggest source of Vic Falls tourists) we’re not allowed to walk to the end of the road, never mind Zimbabwe! I think that SA’s ANC government may be using the ‘lockdown’ to set up a Zimbabwe replica!

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: