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March Weather Past & Present

April 8, 2021
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By Paul Homewood

 

Last month’s weather was as unremarkable as it can get. This is all the Met Office can summon up:

 

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https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/research/climate/maps-and-data/summaries/index

 

 

Note they are still incorrectly using 1981-2010 as the baseline, instead of 1991-2020. The latter would of course tend to give lower anomalies. For instance, March was only 0.7C above the 1991-2020 average, rather than 0.9C. Both temperatures and rainfall were in any case perfectly normal.

Even the warm day on the 30th was not as hot as days in March 1968, or for that matter March 1929 and 1965.

 

 

 

How did last month compare with 50, 60, 70 and 80 years ago?

March 1941 was a pretty miserable affair, but mainly notable for the severe snowstorm in the north of Scotland at the end of the month:

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Ten years later, March was another miserable month, cold and very wet:

 

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In total contrast to the above two years, march 1961 was mild and unusually dry. Indeed it was 0.8C warmer than last month, and is the sixth warmest March on record in the UK:

 

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Finally we come to 1971, which was mainly notable for heavy prolonged rain in the third week:

 

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As we saw in February, there is no such thing as “normal weather” in Britain.

9 Comments
  1. Tim Leeney permalink
    April 8, 2021 11:33 am

    “Finally we come to 1961, which was mainly notable for heavy prolonged rain in the third week:”
    Paul, I think you mean 1971.

  2. C Lynch permalink
    April 8, 2021 11:41 am

    This is an excellent series Paul and a great antidote to the pretence that past climate/weather was consistent and predictable.
    I have shared these articles with some of my warmist friends and acquaintances. Strangely I haven’t had any responses!

  3. mjr permalink
    April 8, 2021 5:07 pm

    apparently Sky News have enhanced their climate page with “the daily climate show” video where you can watch the temperature and CO2 rise in real time .. and full of other right on news
    https://news.sky.com/climate

  4. dearieme permalink
    April 8, 2021 6:12 pm

    Shriek! Climate weirdness!

    Belinda Bletherskite speaking on BBC News said “I’ve never known a March so near the median. It’s uncanny. It must be Climate Change.”

  5. Beagle permalink
    April 8, 2021 11:17 pm

    The weather app on my phone gives a daily forecast high and low, last year’s figures and ‘normal’. There have been very few days this year that have been normal or anywhere near. The average daily maximum was certainly lower than last year or ‘normal’. If the minimum temperature was higher than previous years that could give a higher daily mean temperature but a lower maximum. You can do report the figures to get the result you want. No can deny this winter has been cooler than last year but I knew they would somehow say it was warmer.

  6. Phoenix44 permalink
    April 9, 2021 8:28 am

    It was only noticeably above average because of the two very warm days. They added around 0.6 degrees to the average based on a very rough calculation. So we get Climate Change two days a month do we?

  7. A C Osborn permalink
    April 9, 2021 9:22 am

    Are those Hadcrut temperatures before or after being falsified, oops I mean adjusted for quality.
    How do the older temperatures compare to older versions of hadcrut?

  8. John189 permalink
    April 9, 2021 1:07 pm

    A check back through my 1971 diary very much confirms a somewhat snowy first week of March and then an unremarkable, if rather dry period to follow. As I rooted through old records I also noticed that March 1990 was a warm month with a non-standard recording (my garden slopes south) of 24 Celsius on Sunday 25th. Contrast that to March 2013 with snow onthe ground (W. Yorks) for more than half the days of the month and spectacular drifting – patches of unmelted snow were still visible on north facing fells in late May. All the variables of good, old British weather.

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