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Christian Aid Saving The World From Global Warming!

February 28, 2015

By Paul Homewood

 

h/t Retired Dave

 

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It seems Christian Aid are banging their global warming drum again!

Maybe they could tell us where all these communities are around the world, who are suffering from the effects of climate change?

 

Their website does actually offer a couple of case studies.

 

Read more…

Mikey Discovers Ocean Cycles!

February 27, 2015
tags: ,

By Paul Homewood 

 

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http://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/topstories/scientists-now-know-why-global-warming-has-slowed-down-and-it%E2%80%99s-not-good-news-for-us/ar-BBhZW8r?ocid=iehp

 

Climate “scientist”, Michael Mann, has discovered that the 17 year pause in global warming is due to “internal variability”, particularly ocean cycles. In a paper written with a Byron Somebody, and someone called Sonya, he finds:

 

That internal variability is found in the natural cycles of temperature change that occur over years or even decades in the oceans, like El Niño and La Niña. There are others, like the “Atlantic multidecadal oscillation” and the “Pacific decadal oscillation”…

There is an oceanic tug-of-war between the two systems. Sometimes the ocean cycles worked together to suck heat or burp it skyward—sometimes their push-pull led to a draw.

 

Welcome to the party, Mikey! Some of us have been explaining about this for years.

There is just one slight snag with your explanation. We have been in the warm phase of the AMO since around 1997, and this is actually helping to keep global temperatures up.

As can be seen from the ESRL graph below, when the AMO and PDO moved in concert from cold to warm, first in the 1920’s and 30’s, and later in the 1980’s and 90’s, global temperatures went up.

And when they both turned cold together between the 1940’s and 70’s, temperatures fell.

Currently the cold PDO and warm AMO are helping to offset each other. With the negative PDO likely to last another two decades, and the AMO likely to head south (not literally!) soon, we can expect another 30 years of pause, if not outright cooling.

 

tsgcos.corr.86.182.234.215.57.6.51.16

http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/cgi-bin/gcos_wgsp/tsanalysis.pl?tstype1=91&tstype2=20&year1=&year2=&itypea=0&axistype=1&anom=0&plotstyle=0&climo1=&climo2=&y1=&y2=&y21=&y22=&length=&lag=&iall=0&iseas=1&mon1=0&mon2=11&Submit=Calculate+Results

 

 

 

 

When do I collect my Nobel Prize?

Myths About Biomass

February 27, 2015
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By Paul Homewood  

 

INCREDIBLE JOURNEY GRAPHIC

 http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2581887/The-bonfire-insanity-Woodland-shipped-3-800-miles-burned-Drax-power-station-It-belches-CO2-coal-huge-cost-YOU-pay-cleaner-greener-Britain.html

 

 

It is often claimed that producing electricity from biomass is carbon neutral, and that the CO2 emitted into the atmosphere is simply taken back out when forests are replanted.

Unfortunately, things are not as simple as this.

 

Last April, a number of environmental scientists from the US wrote to Ed Davey outlining their concerns on the matter.

 

Read more…

The Met Office & The Pause

February 26, 2015

By Paul Homewood

 

h/t Green Sand

 

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http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/research/news/2015/variations-rate-global-warming

 

The Met Office have had another attempt at explaining the global temperature hiatus.

Using, you’ve guessed it, “models”, they conclude:

 

A new study, led by Met Office climate scientist Chris Roberts and colleagues, looks at this issue by using a huge archive of climate model simulations collected from a number of international research centres. These are used to study whether internal variability has the potential to offset the expected global surface warming rate of 0.2 °C per decade associated with human influences. 
This archive of 15,000 years of simulated climate represents a ‘laboratory’ in which to study the characteristics of the internal climate variability in the absence of changes in external forcing. These would be impossible to disentangle from the relatively short 150 years of the global observational record, where a number of external forcings come into play.
The researchers found that 20-year periods of global cooling in excess of 0.2 °C per decade can occur, as a result of internal variability alone, about once every hundred years.  Once cooling has been established for 15 years, there is also a high chance (up to one-in-four) that this will persist for a further five years.

 

One would have thought they might have put rather less emphasis on their models, given their abysmal failure so far.

 

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They go on to say:

 

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New Coal Power Station In Germany To Open This Week

February 26, 2015
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By Paul Homewood

 

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http://www.powerengineeringint.com/articles/2015/02/vattenfall-s-hamburg-coal-fired-power-unit-finally-set-to-activate.html

 

News from Germany:

 

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Biomass Emits Double The CO2 Of Gas

February 26, 2015
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McCarthyism Not Dead

February 25, 2015

By Paul Homewood

 

 

Others have covered Roger Pielke Jnr’s run in with US Representative Raúl Grijalva (D-AZ) who is the ranking member of the House of Representatives Committee on Environment and Natural Resources. Anyone who has not seen it, Roger has it on his blog here.

 

But just to bring home Stalinist nature of the “investigation”, I copy below the actual letter sent by Grijalva to the president of Pielke’s university.

 

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BBC Ignore The Facts

February 25, 2015
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By Paul Homewood

 

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-31604953

 

More alarmist nonsense from the BBC, by yet another of their “Environmental Correspondents”. (How many do they ruddy well have?)

Many people reading this will be led to believe that outlandish forecasts of several feet of sea level rise this century must be true. This is what the BBC report:

 

 

Sea levels along the northeast coast of the US rose by record levels during 2009-2010, a study has found.

Sea levels north of New York City rose by 128mm in two years, according to a report in the journal, Nature Communications.

Coastal areas will need to prepare for short term and extreme sea level events, say US scientists.

Climate models suggest extreme sea level rises will become more common this century.

"The extreme sea level rise event during 2009-10 along the northeast coast of North America is unprecedented during the past century," Prof Jianjun Yin of the University of Arizona told BBC News.

"Statistical analysis indicates that it is a 1-in-850 year event."

Scientists at the University of Arizona and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in New Jersey studied records of tidal levels along the east coast of the US and Canada.

They divided the coastline into three areas: north of New York City, New York City to Cape Hatteras on the coast of North Carolina, and south of Cape Hatteras.

They identified what they call an extreme sea-level rise during 2009-10, when the coastal sea level north of New York City jumped by 128mm.

"When coastal storms occur, extreme sea levels can lead to elevated storm surge," said Prof Jianjun Yin.

"In addition to long-term and gradual sea level rise, coastal communities will need to prepare for short and extreme sea level rise events."

Commenting on the study, Prof Rowan Sutton, climate scientist at the National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Reading, said climate models suggest an increase in such events.

"This study identifies a record breaking high sea level event that occurred along part of the US east coast in 2009-10.

"There is strong evidence that the likelihood of such events has been increased by climate change, and that we should expect more such events in the future.

"This example illustrates how individual extreme events are influenced by multiple factors – in this case the global rise of sea levels, regional changes in ocean circulation, and wind patterns."

Dr Dan Hodson, also from the University of Reading, said the analysis underlined the importance of understanding the connections between surges in sea levels and ocean currents.

"Sea level change is a complex phenomenon, especially on the regional scale, where changes to the global ocean circulation can play a major role," he said.

"The east coast of North America is quite close to an area of active, fast ocean currents, and so is quite sensitive to changing ocean circulation."

He said the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), a major current in the Atlantic Ocean, had implications for Europe and Africa as well as the US.

Research at the University of Reading has shown how it could make British summers wetter and may influence rainfall patterns in parts of Africa.

 

This is the paper they refer to:

 

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How Research Grants Corrupt Science

February 25, 2015

By Paul Homewood

 

h/t Joe Public

 

If anybody doubts how massive research grant funding can corrupt climate science, consider this tale from Dr JV’s Frack Land blog. (JV is an applied geophysicist based at the University of Bristol)

 

There is uproar at Bristol University at the sacking of an academic (in the veterinary science department), apparently for failing to secure sufficient research funding. A campaign has been launched for her reinstatement, and it’s been reported in local media as well as HuffPo.

 
This is not an isolated incident. Across the UK, universities are showing themselves willing to fire staff who are failing to bring in research grant money. For instance,
staff at Warwick have been threatened with redundancy if they fail to bring in sufficient research income.

Read more…

Met Office To Go On Strike!

February 24, 2015

By Paul Homewood  

 

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/11431308/Met-Office-staff-to-strike-jeopardising-accuracy-of-weather-forecast.html

 

According to the Telegraph, the strike may compromise the accuracy of weather forecasts.

So I don’t suppose we’ll notice any difference!