Skip to content

Met Office Double Down On Fake Rainfall Record

July 6, 2020

By Paul Homewood

image_thumb-97

https://publish.twitter.com/?query=https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2Fmetoffice%2Fstatus%2F1277577812556341250&widget=Tweet

You will recall the Met Office’s claim last week about a supposed new daily record rainfall for June, which I showed simply not to be true.

They have now officially declared it as a record in their Monthly Statistics bulletin:

image

https://blog.metoffice.gov.uk/2020/07/01/end-of-june-statistics/

I emailed last week to point out their error and ask for a retraction, but so far have had no response.

So, time to recap:

Read more…

The West v The Rest

July 6, 2020

By Paul Homewood

 

  Robin Guenier has a very informative essay on Harmless Sky,  about the history of international climate negotiations:

 

image

How developing countries took control of climate negotiations and what that means for emission reduction.

The main reason why, despite countless scientific warnings about dangerous consequences, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions continue to increase is rarely mentioned. Yet it’s been obvious for several years – at least to anyone willing to see it. It’s this: most countries outside Western Europe, North America and Australasia are either unconcerned about the impact of GHGs on the climate or don’t regard the issue as a priority, focusing instead for example on economic growth. Yet these countries, comprising 84 percent of humanity, are today the source of 75 percent of emissions.[1] Therefore, unless they change their policies radically – and there’s little evidence of their so doing – there’s no realistic prospect of the implementation of the urgent and substantial cuts in GHG emissions called for by many Western scientists.

To understand how this has happened, I believe it’s useful to review the history of environmental negotiation by referring in particular to five UN-sponsored conferences: Stockholm in 1972, Rio in 1992, Kyoto in 1997, Copenhagen in 2009 and Paris in 2015.

 

 The full article can be read here.

A Hydrogen Future? Some Basic Facts

July 5, 2020
tags:

By Paul Homewood

 

 See the source image

 

There has been a wide ranging debate about hydrogen in the last couple of days, so I thought it worthwhile to recap some of the basic facts. Most of these are from the Committee on Climate Change’s Net Zero report last year, otherwise I will provide links.

I have referred to many of these facts before, but they sometimes get lost in the fog of technical debate. If anybody disagrees with these facts, please explain where the CCC went wrong.

Read more…

Japan To Build 22 New Coal Power Plants

July 4, 2020
tags:

By Paul Homewood

 

 image

IN THE WAKE of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011, enthusiasm for renewable energy in Japan swelled. Kan Naoto, the prime minister at the time, declared that the country would draw up a new energy strategy “from scratch” and “elevate” renewables. One of his government’s last acts before losing power was to pass a law to stimulate renewable energy. Dozens of small firms sprang up. Fukushima prefecture itself pledged to get all its power from renewable sources by 2040.

The hoped-for transformation, however, has been slow. Renewable generation has grown from 10% of the power supply in 2010 to 17% in 2018, almost half of which comes from old hydropower schemes. Most nuclear plants, which provided more than a quarter of the country’s power before the disaster, have been shut down, at least for the time being. But for the most part they have been replaced not by wind turbines and solar panels but by power stations that burn coal and natural gas. The current government wants nuclear plants to provide at least 20% of electricity by 2030. It also wants coal’s share of generation to grow, and has approved plans to build 22 new coal-fired plants over the next five years.

https://www.economist.com/graphic-detail/2020/06/21/the-reinvention-of-japans-power-supply-is-making-little-headway

Coal currently accounts for 31% of Japan’s electricity. By contrast wind and solar only provide 8%.

It is true that Japan is also closing a lot of its older, more polluting coal plants. With the switch back to nuclear, we will likely see the share of coal reducing. Nevertheless the new coal power stations due over the next five years will ensure that Japan remains committed to a substantial contribution from coal power for decades to come.

The Economist naturally bemoans the slow transformation to renewables, but Japan knows full well that heavy reliance on wind and solar would be far too dangerous.

XR Demand Net Zero By 2025

July 3, 2020

By Paul Homewood

 

 

Just when you thought the loonies had gone away!

 

 image

Extinction Rebellion has warned it will set up blockades in Westminster to prevent MPs from returning to work. A statement on its website said: "We’re not going to let them back in until they agree to start anew with justice, care and life at the heart of it. From September 1 we will peacefully blockade the UK Parliament in London until they promise that the first thing they’ll do is debate our three demands."

We will peacefully blockade the UK Parliament until they promise to debate our three demands

Extinction Rebellion

Extinction Rebellion said its first demand was for the Government to declare a climate and ecological emergency and work with other institutions to communicate the urgency for change.

The second demand is for the Government to act immediately to halt biodiversity loss and reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2025.

And the group’s third demand is the creation of a "Citizens’ Assembly" on climate and ecological justice…..

Extinction Rebellion said: "We are at an intersection of global crises. Climate breakdown, COVID-19, racial injustice – all are symptoms of a toxic system that is driving us to extinction – a system built on economic inequality, extraction, the destruction of nature, and exploitation.

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1304564/Extinction-Rebellion-blockade-parliament-latest-September-London-news-Cardiff-Edinburgh

 

 

The idea that you can have a peaceful blockade that prevents MPs going to work is a contradiction in terms.

And talk of racial injustice, economic inequality and so on simply confirms the real, hard left agenda, hidden behind their green facade.

Of course, we knew all of this anyway, but what about their new demand for net zero emissions by 2025? Even if we drove the economy off the top of a cliff, it still would not make much of a dent in emissions.

Electricity only accounts for about a tenth of overall emissions in the UK, so even if we could miraculously quadruple our renewable capacity in the next five years, and find a way to manage with the lights going out half the time, it would make little difference.

Domestic users account for another 16% of non power emissions, mainly for heating, cooking and hot water.  Does XR recommend that we freeze to death in winter?

Industry emits about a quarter of GHGs, so that would have to all shut down. Another quarter comes from transport, which would raise the question of how we are all supposed to get to work, except for the fact that we would have no work to go to.

And finally there’s agriculture, with another tenth of emissions, so we would have no food to eat, even if there were lorries to ferry it around, and factories to process it.

 

Still, at least there is one consolation – Emma Thompson would be stuck would not be able to fly back from abroad every time she felt like it!

The Truth Behind Dutch Green Energy Claims

July 3, 2020

By Paul Homewood

 

h/t It doesn’t add up…

 

According to the Energy Monitor 2017 report, 69% of the Dutch consumers use green electricity. Arjen Lubach reveals the real story:

 

 

 

City of Sydney Goes Renewable!

July 2, 2020
tags:

By Paul Homewood

 

h/t Joe Public

 

Clover Moore, the Lord Mayor of the City of Sydney, NSW has announced

"As of today, the City of Sydney is powered by 100% renewable electricity.” 

 image

https://twitter.com/CloverMoore/status/1278076256773222402

 

WOW!!

 

Except for the fact that she was lying through her teeth, as one critic inconveniently pointed out:

 

 image

https://twitter.com/yestiseye/status/1278109196169306113

 

This is the current position:

 image

 image

 https://opennem.org.au/energy/nsw1/

U.N. Warns of Devastating Environmental Side Effects of Electric Car Boom

July 2, 2020

By Paul Homewood

 

 image

The United Nations (U.N.) announced Sunday the electric car boom will result in a number of devastating ecological side effects for the planet.

While the shift to electric cars reflects ongoing efforts to reduce the world’s dependence on fossil fuels, the UN warns that the raw materials used to produce electric car batteries are highly concentrated in a small number of countries and their extraction and refinement pose a serious threat to the environment.

Read more…

Flaming June? Hardly!

July 1, 2020

By Paul Homewood

 

Phew, what a scorcher?? Hardly.

Despite the hype of the last week, the average temperature in England last month was pretty ordinary.

 image

https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadcet/data/download.html

According to the Central England Temperature series, June 2020 was only the 59th warmest on record.

Not only were the four hottest Junes prior to 1900, no June since 1976 has been in the top 17.

image

https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadcet/mly_cet_mean_sort.txt

 

As we so often find with British weather, what we do not seem to get these days is the really cold weather extremes of the past. As for Met Office predictions of ever worsening heatwaves, they have clearly not bothered to check their own historical data.

Boris Rejects Green New Deal

July 1, 2020

By Paul Homewood

 

 The BBC/Guardian’s coordinated campaign for a green deal seems to have run up against the buffers, and the Green Blob are spitting feathers!

 

  

From the Guardian:

 

image

Boris Johnson is to set out a “new deal” for jobs and infrastructure on Tuesday, painting himself as a “Rooseveltian” prime minister lifting Britain out of the biggest recession in centuries, and a pledge to use the coronavirus crisis to tackle unresolved challenges such as health, education and regional inequalities.

“To that end, we will build build build,” he is expected to say. “Build back better, build back greener, build back faster, and to do that at the pace that this moment requires.

However, his promise to “build back greener” was greeted with dismay by environmental experts, who were concerned that the climate crisis receives scant attention in what the government is revealing so far of its plans.

Most of the spending announcements will focus on the NHS, education and improvements for town centres. There will be £100m for roads and £10m for rail in Manchester, as well as £900m on unspecified “shovel-ready” local growth projects in England.

Tree-planting is set for a boost, with Johnson re-affirming plans to plant more than 75,000 acres a year by 2025, with £40m for local conservation projects creating 3,000 jobs and safeguarding 2,000.

Ed Matthew, of the Climate Coalition, said: “The only thing Rooseveltian about this plan is that it belongs in the fossil fuel age. There is very little announced today which will do anything to accelerate the transition to a zero carbon economy. The prime minister has to back up his rhetoric on a green recovery with action to prioritise green investment. Future generations will not forgive a government that fails to use this opportunity to build a safer climate for us all.”

Tanya Steele, chief executive of conservation group WWF, added: “We are in the midst of a climate and nature crisis, and these lukewarm plans address only part of our nation’s much-needed recovery. The prime minister is out of touch with the scale of the challenges.”

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jun/30/environmental-experts-dismayed-by-details-of-johnsons-new-deal

 

I’m sure the general public, who rather outnumber what the Guardian calls “the thousands of people who are participating in the first ever virtual lobby of parliament on the day of this speech, calling for a green recovery”, would much rather see the money spent on the NHS, education and local projects, as the BBC describe:

Read more…