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Daily Express Pushing To End Meat Eating

April 10, 2021

By Paul Homewood

 

 

This week the newly Green Express has been trying to persuade us to stop eating meat:

 

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It found that seven percent of us are vegetarian, three percent vegan with another four percent pescatarian – people who will eat fish but not other meat. Another nine percent class themselves as occasional vegetarians because they regularly choose not to eat meat.  Overall, three in four still see themselves  as carnivores but  26 percent are already reducing their meat consumption and another 36 percent are considering it – a total of 62 percent.

https://www.express.co.uk/news/nature/1418538/green-britain-food-meat-environment-climate-change?utm_source=daily_express_newsletter&utm_campaign=express_green_britain&utm_medium=email&pure360.trackingid=80d0b269-9ee9-4516-b8e9-4e546eac2711

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Ross Ice Shelf Retreated 30 Miles In 19thC

April 9, 2021
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By Paul Homewood

It is well established that glaciers all across the Northern Hemisphere began receding in the 19thC, long before any possible effect from AGW.

But there is plenty of evidence that the same is true on Antarctica. This newspaper report was published in 1932:

 

 

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/23150667#

 

Sir James Ross undertook his expeditions to the Antarctic in the 1840’s.

The ice barrier referred to is the Ross Ice Shelf:

 

 iStock

The shelf is estimated to be retreating by 1.3m a year, with all of the usual nonsense about “several meters of sea level rise if it all melts”. Clearly it was retreating much faster in Bernacchi’s day.

Interestingly, Bernacchi accompanied Scott on the 1901-04 Antarctic expedition. and Scott was best man at his colleague’s wedding in 1906. Bernacchi was invited to go on Scott’s ill fated second expedition, but declined due to family commitments.

Booker On Prince Philip

April 9, 2021

By Paul Homewood

 

 

Time to reminisce:

 

 

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Like countless others, I have a personal reason for wishing to pay tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh as he finally steps back at the age of 96 from many of his more obvious royal duties. In 2009 I published The Real Global Warming Disaster, a history of the the great panic over climate change, which soon ranked with one by Al Gore as one of the three top-selling books on the subject published in this century.

This prompted notably contrasting responses from two members of the Royal family. The Prince of Wales protested that he was quite “bemused”’ by my views on global warming, struck me off his Christmas card list, where I had been ever since was one of his advisers on environmental matters back in the Eighties.

I was, however, startled and delighted to have a long, thoughtful and sympathetic letter from his father, who also wanted to correct a mistake in my book. I had said he was still a supporter of the World Wildlife Fund, which he co-founded in 1961. In fact, he said, he had withdrawn from the WWF after it switched from its original focus on saving endangered species to relentless campaigning against global warming.

Back in the 1960s, I wrote a far from kindly profile of Prince Philip in Private Eye. But over later decades, like many others, I came to have ever more admiration for him, not least since he has represented those values of robust masculine common sense which in the post-war years when I grew up were taken for granted but which in public life today are little more than a distant memory.

In 2011 one newspaper marked his 90th birthday by publishing a whole page of his more “notorious gaffes”. I later met several people who, like me, had gone through that list ticking off every one of his supposedly embarrassing remarks with a nod of amused approval. How fortunate we have been to have such an extraordinary man at the centre of our national life for 70 years.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/08/05/time-prince-philip-wrote-praise-views-global-warming-marked/?mc_cid=6e2787f539&mc_eid=4961da7cb1

Climate Catastrophe In The 17thC – Geoffrey Parker

April 9, 2021
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By Paul Homewood

 

I reviewed this book a few years ago, but it is worth running again:

 

 

 

As the name suggests, this concentrates on the period when the Little Ice Age was at arguably its nadir, the 17thC, and describes how it affected not just Europe, but many other parts of the world.

 

Amazon’s blurb sets the scene: 

Revolutions, droughts, famines, invasions, wars, regicides – the calamities of the mid-seventeenth century were not only unprecedented, they were agonisingly widespread.  A global crisis extended from England to Japan, and from the Russian Empire to sub-Saharan Africa. North and South America, too, suffered turbulence. The distinguished historian Geoffrey Parker examines first-hand accounts of men and women throughout the world describing what they saw and suffered during a sequence of political, economic and social crises that stretched from 1618 to the 1680s. Parker also deploys scientific evidence concerning climate conditions of the period, and his use of ‘natural’ as well as ‘human’ archives transforms our understanding of the World Crisis. Changes in the prevailing weather patterns during the 1640s and 1650s – longer and harsher winters, and cooler and wetter summers – disrupted growing seasons, causing dearth, malnutrition, and disease, along with more deaths and fewer births. Some contemporaries estimated that one-third of the world died, and much of the surviving historical evidence supports their pessimism.

 

 

Amongst these catastrophic events, Parker lists:  

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Nepal Wildfires Worst For Decades (Well, Nine Years Anyway)–Greenpeace

April 8, 2021
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By Paul Homewood

 

 

h/t Joe Public

 

Spot the Difference!

 

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https://twitter.com/Greenpeace/status/1380034147083825155

 

 

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Nepal is experiencing its worst fire season in almost a decade, officials said Tuesday, as huge blazes rage across the country’s forests, engulfing the Himalayan nation in a shroud of brownish haze.

Air quality in the capital Kathmandu was ranked on Tuesday as the worst in the world, according to monitoring site IQAir, with some international flights delayed as thick smoke blanketed the city.

"The highest number of wildfires have been reported this season since records of such incidents were maintained nine years ago," the spokesman for Nepal’s National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Authority, Uddav Prasad Rijal, told AFP.

https://phys.org/news/2021-04-nepal-worst-wildfires-decade.html

March Weather Past & Present

April 8, 2021
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By Paul Homewood

 

Last month’s weather was as unremarkable as it can get. This is all the Met Office can summon up:

 

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https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/research/climate/maps-and-data/summaries/index

 

 

Note they are still incorrectly using 1981-2010 as the baseline, instead of 1991-2020. The latter would of course tend to give lower anomalies. For instance, March was only 0.7C above the 1991-2020 average, rather than 0.9C. Both temperatures and rainfall were in any case perfectly normal.

Even the warm day on the 30th was not as hot as days in March 1968, or for that matter March 1929 and 1965.

 

 

 

How did last month compare with 50, 60, 70 and 80 years ago?

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The Relationship between Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentration and Global Temperature for the Last 425 Million Years

April 7, 2021
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By Paul Homewood

 

You may recall the BBC’s Royal Institution Christmas Lecture on, yes you’ve guessed it, climate change. It presented this graph purportedly proving that temperature changes (yellow) followed CO2 changes (white):

 

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https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2020/12/29/royal-institution-lecture-on-climate-change/

 

As I pointed out at the time, the bits of string were horridly fake and misleading.

Perhaps, instead of treating children like, well children, they might have given them the facts:

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Subsidence In The Bangladesh Basin

April 7, 2021

By Paul Homewood

 

 

Just returning to that Bangladesh piece yesterday, there is section at the end which includes a couple of relevant comments:

 

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-56485667 

We often hear complaints about how Bangladeshi farmers are increasingly affected by flooding. This should be of little surprise when the land has been subsiding for a long time. There is also a very good reason why people in the past chose to live on higher land!

 

The problem of subsidence has been well known for a long time, and it is widespread across the Bengal Basin, and not just the local district described above:

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https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-94-015-8719-8_9

 

Absolute sea levels are rising by about 2mm a year, yet the land is subsiding by 2.2cm a year. A small part of this is due to isostasy, but most is evidently the result of “dewatering”, what we would call water extraction. (see here)

Whatever problems farmers in Bangladesh are having, it has nothing to do with climate change.

Australian Floods

April 6, 2021
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By Paul Homewood

 

 

Floods in Australia made big news last month, (Click on link to watch video):

 

 

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-australia-56505901

 

 

The floods mainly affected NSW and SE Queensland. The video talks of “less than 1%” chance of this amount of rainfall occurring. But the BOM figures don’t support this claim.

In NSW, although it was the second wettest March, it was considerably wetter in 1956. Moreover it was not particularly wet in February, so the ground would not have been saturated.

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Arctic Sea Ice Extent Higher Than 2006

April 6, 2021
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By Paul Homewood

 

 

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https://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/2021/03/arctic-sea-ice-reaches-uneventful-maximum/

 

 

Seventh lowest? The NSIDC would of course like you to believe that this is all part of a declining trend. In reality, since the sharp decline beginning in 2004, sea ice extent has gone up and down, but with little overall change. This year and last year, average March extent has actually been higher than in 2006.

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