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Decarbonising Heating

July 24, 2017
tags: ,

By Paul Homewood

 

 

Stove Gas Stock Photos

 

I’ve posted about this before, but it is something which cannot be swept under the carpet.

Heating accounts for about 18% of the UK’s CO2 emissions, but eliminating these simply by switching from gas to electric is not a straightforward as it sounds. This is because demand peaks during winter months, and of course at certain times of the day.

Below is a chart from the Imperial College, and incorporated in a report by the Parliamentary Advisory Group on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) last year. It shows the estimated national half hourly heat demand (red) for 2010, and the actual national electricity demand (grey).

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http://www.ccsassociation.org/news-and-events/reports-and-publications/parliamentary-advisory-group-on-ccs-report/

 

 

As the report points out, peak heat demand exceeds peak electricity by a factor of 5 to 6.

Clearly, to replace gas for heating would necessitate a massive increase in electricity generation capacity and transmission capacity. And that assumes that the electricity will actually be available when we need it.

So far, government plans have not got far past heat pumps and a bit of district heating networks. But as the Report points out, this is just spitting in the wind. Instead, it recommends a mass roll out of hydrogen production, via steam reformation.

Both decarbonisation scenarios require CCS on a massive scale, something that does not even exist in any viable form.

I have looked at the hydrogen option before, and we know it would be astronomically expensive, simply just to set up. Ongoing costs of transforming gas into hydrogen, and then paying to pipe all of the CO2 under the North Sea would add considerably to the cost to consumers.

 

Harrabin prattles on about smart energy, battery storage and solar panels. If that is all we have to rely on, heaven help us all!

World’s first floating wind farm emerges off coast of Scotland–At huge cost to UK electricity users

July 24, 2017

By Paul Homewood

 

h/t Joe Public

 

Harrabin’s been a busy boy this week!

 

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The world’s first full-scale floating wind farm has started to take shape off the north-east coast of Scotland.

 

Read more…

Electricity shake-up could save consumers ‘up to £40bn’–Harrabin

July 24, 2017

By Paul Homewood

 

 

h/t Various!!

 

 

Another grossly one sided report from Roger Harrabin:

 

 

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Consumers in the UK could save billions of pounds thanks to major changes in the way electricity is made, used and stored, the government has said.

Read more…

Japan, China, and South Korea violate Paris agreement by funding coal in Indonesia

July 23, 2017
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By Paul Homewood

 

From Christian Science Monitor:

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July 19, 2017 Bangkok—Japan, China, and South Korea are bankrolling environmentally destructive coal-fired power plants in Indonesia despite their pledges to reduce climate-changing emissions under the Paris climate deal, analysts told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Australia-based environmental finance organization Market Forces said it analyzed 22 coal power deals in Indonesia since January 2010 and found state-run financiers for the three nations were involved in 18 of them.

In all, foreign banks, both commercial and state-owned, are providing 98 percent of the debt finance for the projects, amounting to $16.7 billion.

Indonesian banks provided just 2 percent of the financial resources for the projects, according to the Market Forces analysis published this week.

Japan, China, and South Korea "are on board with the Paris climate change agreement. They make all the right noises politically," Julien Vincent, executive director of Market Forces, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in a phone interview.

But "these are the same governments underwriting new coal development elsewhere," he said, calling the actions "egregious."

https://www.csmonitor.com/World/2017/0719/Japan-China-and-South-Korea-violate-Paris-agreement-by-funding-coal-in-Indonesia

 

Some of us have been pointing out this sort of hypocrisy for a while!

50-Year Sea Level Trends At Newlyn & North Shields

July 22, 2017
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By Paul Homewood

As promised, I have also run some charts showing 50-year trends for sea level rise at Newlyn and North Shields.

As any half competent oceanographer will tell you, you need to be looking at trends of at least 50 years, as Bruce Douglas points out:

It is well established that sea level trends obtained from tide gauge records shorter than about 50-60 years are corrupted by interdecadal sea level variation.

 

As with the 10-year trends I presented yesterday, the charts below give 50-year trends on an overlapping monthly basis:

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http://www.psmsl.org/data/obtaining/

 

Both stations show accelerating sea level rise culminating in 1970, before dropping away, and then recovering again in the 1990s.

There is a subtle difference though. The trend at Newlyn is slightly higher now than its peak in 1970, whereas at North Shields it is still well below.

Newlyn is of course heavily influenced by what happens in the Atlantic, so that may be a factor.

Either way, there is no evidence of anything alarming happening to sea levels at these two stations at least.

Analysis Of Sea Level Trends At Newlyn

July 21, 2017
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By Paul Homewood

 

I have been playing around with the sea level data at Newlyn, which I published yesterday, in order to try and detect whether the rate of rise is accelerating.

To recap, this is the tide gauge record since 1915:

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https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2017/07/20/uk-sea-level-data-for-2016/

 

I have plotted the 10-year trends on an overlapping monthly basis:

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http://www.psmsl.org/data/obtaining/stations/202.php

 

At the end of 2016, the trend was 3.23mm/yr, ie between 2007 and 2016. This of course is higher than the trend of 1.83mm recorded over the full history of the gauge.

But does this mean that the rate of rise is actually accelerating?

Read more…

UK Sea Level Data For 2016

July 20, 2017
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By Paul Homewood

 

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https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-climate-change-risk-assessment-2017

According to the Government’s latest UK Climate Change Risk Assessment, sea levels around the UK are rising by around 3mm a year.

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This is an outright lie.

Read more…

National Grid’s Future Energy Scenarios: Cui Bono?

July 20, 2017

By Paul Homewood

 

h/t Philip Bratby

 

John Constable has his own take on the National Grid’s Future Energy Scenarios published last week:

 

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National Grid’s recently published Future Energy Scenarios, 2017, is in essence an examination of its own prospects in a period of policy driven sectoral transformation. However turbulent the future appears to be for generators, and however costly for consumers, shareholders in National Grid can sleep easy at night. Things will be fine, for them at least.

Read more…

Green Jobs Lost As Green Subsidies Dry Up–But Elon Musk Set To Make Billions From Californian Taxpayers

July 19, 2017

By Paul Homewood

 

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The crazy world of renewable subsidies just goes from bad to worse:

 

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Up to 100 solar PV firms in Japan could face bankruptcy this year, with more than double the number of firms going bust in the first half of this year than the same period in 2016.

 

Read more…

Siemens To Shut Canadian Wind Turbine Plant

July 18, 2017

By Paul Homewood

h/t Francis Bowkett

 

So much for all of these green jobs promised.

News from BNN:

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TILLSONBURG, Ont. – Hundreds of people will be losing their jobs in Tillsonburg, Ont., after a major international company announced the closure of a factory manufacturing wind turbine blades.

Siemens Wind Power Ltd. has announced the factory that employed 340 workers is not large enough to build the sorts of bigger turbine blades the company needs to stay competitive in an increasingly challenging market.

Although the factory won’t be fully closed until early 2018, the majority of staff will feel the effects right away

Siemens says 206 staff are out of work effective immediately, with the rest being phased out over the rest of the year.

The company says it will provide career counselling and job placement support for all employees.

Siemens described the decision as a difficult one, but said the plant was simply not viable given drastic shifts in the demands and profitability of the industry.

http://www.bnn.ca/siemens-to-close-ontario-turbine-plant-cut-hundreds-of-jobs-1.807596

 

 

Despite massive subsidies for wind power, companies like Siemens are still struggling to make a profit.

As with much else, the business, and the jobs, are increasingly heading to China.