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Polar Vortex In 1936

April 17, 2014
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By Paul Homewood

 

Tabloid climatologists continue to try to blame the America’s cold winter this year on global warming, but as WUWT and Steve Goddard have pointed out, the USA had exactly the same pattern of weather in the winter of 1976/77.

 

screenhunter_226-apr-15-15-38

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1899&dat=19830325&id=cAUgAAAAIBAJ&sjid=9WQFAAAAIBAJ&pg=1417,3960641

 

And if you go back to 1936, the second coldest winter on record in the CONUS, you also find something similar.

The GISS maps below compare the winter of 1935/6 with this year.

 

nmaps

http://data.giss.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/gistemp/nmaps.cgi?sat=4&sst=3&type=anoms&mean_gen=1203&year1=1936&year2=1936&base1=1951&base2=1980&radius=1200&pol=rob

 

nmaps

http://data.giss.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/gistemp/nmaps.cgi?sat=4&sst=3&type=anoms&mean_gen=1203&year1=2014&year2=2014&base1=1951&base2=1980&radius=1200&pol=rob

 

Although 1935/6 is colder, we can see very similar patterns:

 

  • Cold weather plunging down from the Arctic over the eastern half of the country.
  • Much warmer conditions in the West.
  • Milder air than usual over Greenland.
  • Warm weather over most of Europe.

They did not know they had a jet stream in 1936, but it still had the same effect on weather as it does now.

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7 Comments leave one →
  1. William Abbott permalink
    April 17, 2014 7:23 pm

    Look at the warm pool in the Gulf of Alaska, present in both ’35 and ’36 and ’13 & ’14. Joe Bastardi and Joe D’Aleo, the meteorologists at weatherbell.com insist the warm pool of water in the Gulf of Alaska is a principal driver of this winter’s dipping jet stream. October 2013, they did a very good job of calling the winter well below normal cold for the Central and Eastern CONUS.

  2. April 17, 2014 7:29 pm

    Reblogged this on CraigM350.

  3. Andy DC permalink
    April 17, 2014 9:20 pm

    Huge difference in Siberia. Question is whether all that red in Siberia is for real, or a result of “adjustments”? Or maybe “interpolation”. Or perhaps “extrapolation”? Or even a couple out of whack themometers. Whatever!

  4. Hector Pascal permalink
    April 18, 2014 1:52 am

    Andy DC

    I’m in northern Japan, not Siberia, but that’s where our winter weather comes from. This last winter was exceptionally mild, I don’t have the numbers yet, but I estimate we only had 4-5 metres of snow versus our normal 12-16 metres. I know about this stuff. Its my job to remove the snow before business opens.

  5. the1pag permalink
    April 18, 2014 9:17 pm

    In 1935 I was only 11 years old but I remember well that miserable cold winter. I was living at my parents’ home in Wilmette, Ill., a suburb on Chicago’s North Shore of Lake Michigan. If I recall correctly, in looking out my bedroom mwindow at a thermometer, early one morning before bundling up for a two-block walk to school, I saw minus 28 degrees F.

    From those years when I was just a kid, I can remember lots of frigid winters and also some very hot summers, when, before the era of air-conditioning, in July we occasionally had to sleep on the living-room floor because it was so incredibly hot in our bedrooms upstairs. Today’s childish wimps who worry about global warming better grow up and start worrying about temperature cycles– global cooling is coming!

  6. April 19, 2014 2:27 pm

    Paul Homewood permalink*

    April 17, 2014 7:34 pm

    Slingo blamed it on rain in the Philippines
    ***

    A true Political Animal at work

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