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Record Rainfalls A Thing Of The Past

August 30, 2017

By Paul Homewood

 

 

USmap

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/ohd/hdsc/record_precip/record_precip_us.html

 

 

We keep being told by climate alarmists that global warming is responsible for more intensive rainfall, the theory being that a warmer atmosphere can hold more moisture.

Funny then that when we look at rainfall records across the US for all sorts of different timescales, we find none at all since 1981.

 

image

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/ohd/hdsc/record_precip/record_precip_us.html

 

 

Take particular note of the four records in Texas:

  • Galveston 1871 – 3.95” in 15 minutes
  • Woodward Ranch 1935 – 15.0” in 2 hours
  • Thrall 1921 – 36.4” in 18 hours
  • Alvin 1979 – 43” in 24 hours

Storm Harvey never got anywhere near these sort of totals.

 

 

And we find a very similar picture when we review global records, with the most recent record being as long ago as 1980.

 

 

image

image

image

http://www.bom.gov.au/water/designRainfalls/rainfallEvents/worldRecRainfall.shtml

 

 

FOOTNOTE

It has been pointed out that the global records, still shown as current on the BOM website, are actually from a WMO 1994 publication.

The latest WMO data shows:

image

https://wmo.asu.edu/content/world-meteorological-organization-global-weather-climate-extremes-archive

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16 Comments
  1. NeilC permalink
    August 30, 2017 3:04 pm

    Is the translation of Cherrapunji, the land of ducks? Or maybe it’s too wet for them too!

  2. Broadlands permalink
    August 30, 2017 3:12 pm

    Alvin 1979 – 43” in 24 hours. Yes, but it was measured by “an observer”.

    “The heaviest amount was recorded just to the south of Houston in the town of Alvin. An observer measured a record 43 inches of rainfall in just 24 hours, which stands as the greatest 24-hour rainfall total in U.S. history. The storm total beyond the 24-hour record was 45 inches.”

    Weather.com

    • August 30, 2017 3:48 pm

      No time frame for this but presumably a few days…

      ‘In Southeast Houston, a weather station has registered more than 51 inches of rain from Tropical Storm Harvey. The measurement is preliminary, but if confirmed, it will mean Harvey has broken the record for the greatest amount of rain recorded from a single tropical storm or hurricane in the continental United States. It’s more than 4 feet of rain.
      . . .
      An additional 6 to 12 inches of rain are expected over much of Houston. As of yesterday, Harvey had dumped an estimated 15 trillion gallons over East Texas.’

      http://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2017/8/29/16221542/hurricane-harvey-rainfall-record-houston

      • Joe Public permalink
        August 30, 2017 4:24 pm

        From the NCEP Weather Prediction Center:

        http://www.wpc.ncep.noaa.gov/discussions/nfdscc1.html

        “STORM SUMMARY NUMBER 18 FOR TROPICAL STORM HARVEY PRELIMINARY
        RAINFALL TOTALS AND WIND REPORTS
        NWS WEATHER PREDICTION CENTER COLLEGE PARK MD
        1000 AM CDT WED AUG 30 2017

        …TROPICAL STORM HARVEY PRELIMINARY OBSERVED RAIN TOTALS AND WIND
        REPORTS…

        FOR A DETAILED GRAPHICAL DEPICTION OF THE LATEST
        WATCHES…WARNINGS AND ADVISORIES…PLEASE SEE http://WWW.WEATHER.GOV

        AT 900 AM CDT…THESE ARE THE MOST RECENT PRELIMINARY RAINFALL AND
        WIND REPORTS FROM TROPICAL STORM HARVEY. PLEASE REFER TO NHC FOR
        THE LATEST PUBLIC ADVISORIES ON HARVEY.

        …SELECTED PRELIMINARY STORM TOTAL RAINFALL IN INCHES FROM 800 PM CDT THU AUG 24 THROUGH 900 AM CDT WED AUG 30…”

        Scroll down to Texas: – CEDAR BAYOU AT FM 1942 recorded 51.88 inches since 800 PM CDT THU AUG 24 to 900 AM CDT WED AUG 30

      • August 30, 2017 6:07 pm

        Guys those totals are not 24 hours but from start of storm.
        again a cherrypicking trick is to pick something like 4 hours.
        Potus did tweet “record rainfall”
        but what about Hawaii ?

  3. August 30, 2017 3:14 pm

    It’s cold that causes intense rain. It’s because as a cold front advances, the colder air lifts warmer air ahead of it. The air cools as it rises and the moisture condenses to produce clouds and precipitation ahead of and along the cold front. In contrast to lifting along a warm front, upward motions along a cold front are typically more vigorous, producing deeper clouds and more intense bands of showers and thunderstorms.

  4. James Taylor permalink
    August 30, 2017 4:25 pm

    The ‘world records’ are from a 1994 publication according to the webpage you have linked to.

  5. Jack Broughton permalink
    August 30, 2017 6:06 pm

    On the BBC radio 4 this pm, I heard a reporter say that the fault for Houston’s flooding lay squarely with the planners and that the threatened floods were expected some years ago and caused by building on the flood plains with excessive use of concrete in the suburbs.

    Sounds a bit like the flooding in Cumbria and Somerset: very convenient to pass the buck to the vague concept of climate change. He also said that once the insurers had paid up it would be re-built as it was, OMG, LOL.

    The reporter will have been fired by now as he did not mention “CC” once!

    • Gerry, England permalink
      August 31, 2017 1:04 pm

      They obviously didn’t vet that guy properly before employing him. Never to be heard of again.

  6. August 30, 2017 6:11 pm

    Note how these guys say “continental”

  7. August 30, 2017 7:08 pm

    Reblogged this on Climate Collections.

  8. August 30, 2017 8:30 pm

    Reblogged this on WeatherAction News and commented:
    Réunion is one wet place

    https://weather.com/storms/severe/news/reunion-island-world-record-rainfalls

  9. lloydr56 permalink
    August 30, 2017 10:34 pm

    So Vox reports total rainfall, in one place, from one tropical cyclone “and its remnants,” without specifying number of days/hours. https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2017/8/29/16221542/hurricane-harvey-rainfall-record-houston

    Harvey in comparison to other Cat 4 hurricanes was not a big deal re pressure or wind speed. Led to rains which are a much bigger deal–storm remained in one place.Still no new record for continental U.S. for a specific time period?

  10. Rosco permalink
    August 30, 2017 11:56 pm

    Queensland cyclone records indicate cyclones result in large rainfalls at any time and use of them to promote a ridiculous theory about trace atmospheric gases is despicable.

    The all time reliable record is cyclone Peter in 1979 with 1947 mm, 76.65 inches, of rain. Cyclones tend to dissipate fairly quickly except Oswald in 2013 and Wanda in 1974.

    Second is Rona-Frank in 1999 with 1870 mm, 73.62 inches of rain.

    Many people have heard of the 1974 Brisbane, Queensland floods and possibly the 2011 Brisbane, Queensland floods.

    Wanda in 1974 is the third highest ranked cyclone but Brisbane is located 520 km from the Tropic of Capricorn so Wanda was a rain depression when it arrived at Brisbane.

    Wanda dumped 1318 mm, 51.89 inches of rain at Mount Glorious 34 km west of Brisbane.

    The 2011 floods were caused by rainfall totals less than a third of the 1974 event lending credence to the claim the flood was caused by mismanagement of the flood control dam at Wivenhoe.

    After a decade of drought with fears heightened by incessant climate alarm when Wivenhoe – a flood control dam not a water supply dam – finally received good falls in 2010 politicians refused to let the precious water go until it was too late. Wivenhoe dam almost over topped which would have been an unmitigated disaster but not due to extreme rainfall.

    The extreme record for Queensland was probably 1893 –

    “The 1893 Brisbane flood, occasionally referred to as the Great Flood of 1893 or the Black February flood, occurred when the Brisbane River burst its banks on three occasions in February 1893.

    It was the occurrence of three major floods in the same month that saw the period named “Black February”.

    There was also a fourth flood event later in the same year in June.

    The river runs through the centre of Brisbane in the Australian state of Queensland, with much of the population living in areas beside the river.

    It was flooded in the first flood on 6 February due to a deluge associated with a tropical cyclone, called “Buninyong”.[1][2]

    The second cyclone struck on 11 February, causing relatively minor flooding compared to the first flood.

    When the third cyclone came on 19 February, it was almost as devastating as the first, and it left up to one third of Brisbane’s residents homeless. This time however the flood in the Brisbane River was largely from waters from the upper reaches of Brisbane River, rather than the Stanley River.[3]

    For the first flood, Crohamhurst recorded an all-time Australian record of 914.4 mm of rain in a 24-hour period.[4]

    The water surge was recorded on the Port Office gauge (now the City gauge) as being 8.35 metres (27 feet, 5 inches) above the low tide level.

    The February 1893 floods were the second and third highest water levels ever recorded at the City gauge, the highest being the January 1841 flood at 8.43 metres (27 feet, 8 inches).[5] There was however some oral aboriginal history suggesting a flood level of nearly 12 m prior to the first European settlement.

    The 1893 events was preceded by two notable yet less severe floods in 1887 and 1890. Both were caused by high levels of summer rainfall; however the rainfall around this period (with the exception of the two summers) was described as “very low”.[6]

    914.4 mm in 24 hours – an inch and a half for 24 hours. I’ve seen similar records recorded at Mirani near Mackay where rain fell at a constant inch an hour over 36 hours in the largest flood of the Pioneer River in 1958 – I once worked for the Council there. The Clerk kept the recorded rainfall graph for posterity.

    Draw your own conclusions but alarmists are miserable scum feeding off people’s misery !

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