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December 1941 & 1951

January 7, 2022
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By Paul Homewood

 

December 2021 was another pretty nondescript month weather wise.

UK mean temperature of 5.3C was 1.1C higher than the 30-yr average.

Extremes included a top temperature of 16.5C, daily rainfall of 97.2mm at Honister Pass (yes, they still use this totally unrepresentative rain gauge), and gusts of 86 mph at Aberdaron.

Eighty years before was also a dull, mainly mild affair. Temperature reached 15.6C at Skegness.

While it was notably dry overall, there were severe gales in Scotland, with winds reaching 100 mph:

 

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December 1951 was also dull and mild, with a top temperature of 15C. However the real story was the east/west split, with the latter very wet. Parts of Lancashire received more than twice the average rainfall.

Daily rainfall of well over 2 inches were commonplace and widespread on several days. Severe gales were frequent in Scotland, with a top gust of 94 kts (108 mph) recorded at Millport:

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4 Comments
  1. 1saveenergy permalink
    January 7, 2022 12:29 pm

    Paul, please stop showing empirical evidence that weather patterns are cyclical.
    The climate gurus Gore & Mann have told us that past weather was benign ( but we are making it more worserer than worse ) & climate slyence was settled, so get back with the program –

    Repeat this 10 times a day
    Magic CO2 causes the weather to be wet & dry, hot & cold, seas rise & fall, ice form & melt … all at the same time … & in the same place.

  2. Joe Public permalink
    January 7, 2022 1:03 pm

    Should Climate Change now be marketed as Climate Doesn’t Change?

  3. Brian permalink
    January 7, 2022 2:37 pm

    No – climate does and can change over time, but the changes are driven by natural cycles, not by man!

  4. January 7, 2022 3:19 pm

    Thanks again Paul. I just wish those lazy journalists would follow your example and do their homework before using those dreaded terms like: ‘Unprecedented’ and ‘Due to’ etc.

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