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What The “Strongest Ever” Hurricane Looks Like

October 25, 2015

By Paul Homewood   

 

image

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/oct/22/mexico-floods-hurricane-patricia-central-pacific-coast

 

 

What the “strongest ever” hurricane looks like, courtesy of the Telegraph:

 

ScreenHunter_2919 Oct. 24 18.46

ScreenHunter_2920 Oct. 24 18.46

ScreenHunter_2921 Oct. 24 18.47

ScreenHunter_2922 Oct. 24 18.47

ScreenHunter_2923 Oct. 24 18.48

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/centralamericaandthecaribbean/mexico/11952245/Hurricane-Patricia-hits-spares-Mexico-of-major-damage-so-far.html

 

ScreenHunter_2924 Oct. 24 18.50

ScreenHunter_2925 Oct. 24 18.50

https://twitter.com/hashtag/Patricia?src=hash&ref_src=twsrc^tfw

 

According to “expert” Eric Holthaus:

 

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http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2015/10/23/hurricane_patricia_was_made_worse_by_climate_change.html

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32 Comments
  1. Joe Public permalink
    October 25, 2015 10:47 am

    It’s amazing how forthcoming COP beanos seem to germinate climate scare stories. It’s almost as if some parties eagerly look forward to reporting devastation & hardships.

    • October 25, 2015 12:21 pm

      What makes you think they aren’t salivating to report death and destruction?

  2. October 25, 2015 11:14 am

    Reblogged this on runglaz.

  3. rwoollaston permalink
    October 25, 2015 11:24 am

    Courtesy of The washington Post yesterday:

    The oceans heating up because of climate change will have consequences, said Michael Mann, a climate researcher at Penn State University. “Hurricane Patricia, and her unprecedented 200 mile-per-hour sustained winds, appears to be one of them now, unfortunately.”

    • October 25, 2015 12:20 pm

      Predicted with the accuracy of his “hockey stick curve”.

    • October 25, 2015 2:13 pm

      Looks to me like we should be cheering on climate change. Oh but that all Cat 5 Hurricanes were so “apocalyptic”.

    • chip seiple permalink
      October 26, 2015 5:35 pm

      Can you imagine a hockey puck traveling at 200 mph after being hit by Mann’s super sonic “Hockey stick”?.

  4. Adrian permalink
    October 25, 2015 12:05 pm

    My recycling bin blew over the other day. Can I claim compensation for the inconvenience, and for my genuine ‘fear and terror’ caused by agw?

    • October 25, 2015 2:04 pm

      No, but we might have to fine you for your bin not being in its allotted place!

  5. October 25, 2015 12:22 pm

    Has anyone heard from Texas? They were supposed to obliterated by this storm.

  6. A C Osborn permalink
    October 25, 2015 12:32 pm

    The problem is that this recent major over hyping of Typhoons/Hurricanes/Storms is similar to the boy crying wolf.
    In this case a great deal of money was spent protecting properties and evacuating people for a complete “no show”.
    It won’t take many like that before people won’t bother and then when the Real One does come along people could die.
    The reporting organisations supposedly had aircraft also measuring wind speeds of over 200Mph and yet no really high Ground Wind Speeds were measured, the damage was minimal and the dissipation far too quick for a force 5 Hurricane.
    So have these people lied or did their equipment malfunction, or do we not understand how Hurricanes work?

    • October 25, 2015 2:16 pm

      My vote would be “we don’t understand hurricanes” and the media cries apocalypse constanting, leading people to ignore or laugh at what is reported. Had they said preparation was necessary and then praised people for their actions, it would have been fine. It worked in the Phillipines—they evacuated and few were killed even though that was a huge storm. Instead of scare stories, pushing preparedness would actually be useful.

  7. October 25, 2015 12:35 pm

    Thanks, Paul.
    It seems like Patricia did not live up to its hype. Good riddance.
    This one was evidently mann-made.

  8. NeilC permalink
    October 25, 2015 12:53 pm

    The whole CAGW scam has gone beyond over exaggeration and is now just lies, lies and more lies

  9. October 25, 2015 12:56 pm

    What I’d like to see is the actual raw data for wind speeds. It certainly appeared to be a strong storm, no doubt about that. And, there was apparently a big spike of sustained winds over 200mph for 1 minute once. But, what was the actual typical sustained wind speed? Having a lot of trouble finding that data. Surprise?

  10. October 25, 2015 1:14 pm

    Reblogged this on Petrossa's Blog and commented:
    hysterical ‘news’ from the MSM will last till after December meeting in Paris. After that a reduction in ‘oh god we’re all going to die’ news just until the next taxpayers paid junket in some far away place. It is truly a sinusoidal pattern from junket to junket. Hey, but luckily we can solace our conscience by giving money to some ultra activist group like Greenpeace/Amnesty/WWF or which ever money-sucking NGO whose managers earn more than your average high placed civil ‘servant’

  11. rah permalink
    October 25, 2015 1:49 pm

    Patricia was a monster when out at sea but as it approached land dry air and mountains that run right up to the coast caused it to quickly dissipate. It dropped to CAT I level even before the eye wall reached the coast and continued to weaken very quickly. Joe Bastardi explains this and also has some explanation for why the wind speeds being recorded in tropical systems now days are higher than they were in the past. It all comes down to better technology. Unfortunately it seems the forecasters are unable or unwilling to adapt their forecasts to this fact. But there was no doubt that the hype for Patricia was, dare I say it? Unprecedented!

    http://www.weatherbell.com/saturday-summary-october-24-2015

  12. Joe Public permalink
    October 25, 2015 2:35 pm

    BREAKING NEWS:

    Massive search operation launched by 100s of hacks with pre-written ‘death & devastation’ stories to justify.

    Reminiscent of the Times’ (internal) competition to devise the most accurate yet boring headline. Claude Cockburn claimed the honours with “Small Earthquake in Chile, Not many dead”.

  13. October 25, 2015 5:27 pm

    Looks like there was more damage in Scotland than Mexico (recent winds picked up our trampoline and dumped it on our neighbours car) – which fortunately escaped with only some minor scratches.

  14. Gary H permalink
    October 25, 2015 5:28 pm

    Well – here’s what a real massive Cat 5 hurricane looks like at landfall. Hurricane Gilbert, Sept 14th, 1988, in Cozumel, MX. Give or take some small part of an hour – we went out in the eye and were looking skyward right about when this picture was taken. Note the size of the eye wall and how small the eye is: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/gifs/1988gilbert.gif

    185 mph sustained – 228ish gusts. We lived. Moral of story – reinforced concrete building, with concrete roof.

    Had a couple of nice chats about this one with Chris Landsea.

  15. Keith Gugan permalink
    October 25, 2015 6:39 pm

    If the ‘experts’ cry wolf they should not be surprised when the rest of us take no notice.

  16. I Don't Believe It! permalink
    October 25, 2015 7:30 pm

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Up_to_eleven%5D

    “Up to eleven” or “these go to eleven” is an idiom from popular culture, coined in the movie This Is Spinal Tap, where guitarist Nigel Tufnel proudly demonstrates an amplifier whose volume knob is marked from zero to eleven, instead of the usual zero to ten. The phrase has come to refer to anything being exploited to its utmost limits, or apparently exceeding them. ……”

  17. Genghis permalink
    October 25, 2015 7:50 pm

    In what context is this the “Strongest Hurricane Ever”. How long have we been measuring and recording hurricane wind speeds in Mexico, the Caribbean or at sea? Only since the weather satellite era starting in 1979? In the USA we have a long record of wind speeds (back to 1850) when hurricanes come ashore, but very little on wind speeds at sea.

  18. Elvis permalink
    October 25, 2015 8:15 pm

    Patricia apparently missed Puerto Vallarta, hence the lack of impact.

  19. Svend Ferdinandsen permalink
    October 26, 2015 12:23 am

    Even if it was strong before landfall, how could it be that no one predicted it would detoriate so fast? The warnings were approbiate, but some modellers/meteorologists may have red ears.

  20. October 26, 2015 2:19 am

    Yes I note a comment on Galileo Movement about Wikipedia propaganda “I changed the entry for this on wikipedia (List of Category 5 Pacific hurricanes) to 165 mph……from 200mph and they changed it back…….the wind speeds should be recorded when it hit land,so you can compare it to previous hurricanes”

  21. October 26, 2015 4:45 pm

    How long can they cry ‘wolf’ before they are igfnored?

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