Skip to content

Ocean Cycles, Not Humans, May Be Behind Most Observed Climate Change

September 20, 2017
tags:

By Paul Homewood

 

 

image

An eminent atmospheric scientist says that natural cycles may be largely responsible for climate changes seen in recent decades. 

In a new report published by the Global Warming Policy Foundation, Anastasios Tsonis, emeritus distinguished professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, describes new and cutting-edge research into natural climatic cycles, including the well known El Nino cycle and the less familiar North Atlantic Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

He shows how interactions between these ocean cycles have been shown to drive changes in the global climate on timescales of several decades.

Professor Tsonis says:

“We can show that at the start of the 20th century, the North Atlantic Oscillation pushed the global climate into a warming phase, and in 1940 it pushed it back into cooling mode. The famous “pause” in global warming at the start of the 21st century seems to have been instigated by the North Atlantic Oscillation too.”

In fact, most of the changes in the global climate over the period of the instrumental record seem to have their origins in the North Atlantic.

Tsonis’ insights have profound implications for the way we view calls for climate alarm.

It may be that another shift in the North Atlantic could bring about another phase shift in the global climate, leading to renewed cooling or warming for several decades to come.

These climatic cycles are entirely natural, and can tell us nothing about the effect of carbon dioxide emissions. But they should inspire caution over the slowing trajectory of global warming we have seen in recent decades.

As Tsonis puts it:

“While humans may play a role in climate change, other natural forces may play important roles too.”

https://www.thegwpf.com/ocean-cycles-not-humans-may-be-behind-most-observed-climate-change/

 

This is another reminder of the major role that oceans play in the Earth’s climate.

Advertisements
12 Comments
  1. September 20, 2017 10:35 am

    Climate change is due to natural causes? Well, who knew. I wonder if that could be the reason for major climate changes during the past few thousand years?

    • September 20, 2017 10:40 am

      Or even millions of years; long before the invention of the wheel, let alone the SUV.

      • September 20, 2017 11:00 am

        The shifting of the continents smashing into each other and breaking apart has dramatic effects on the climate. Deserts are created or turned into lush forests depending upon the wind/weather patterns created.

        India heading north and attaching to Asia formed the Himalayas which are still rising as India stubbornly moves ever northward. That is the reason for the monsoons which are caused by weather patterns created by the mountains.

        There is coal under the Antarctic ice sheets and in West Virginia. It takes the climate of Indonesia to produce coal, so we can suspect that it was quite different than what we encounter in these places today.

  2. September 20, 2017 11:34 am

    Its never been scientifically explained how infinitesimal changes in the atmosphere of a naturally occurring trace gas can lead to irreversible catastrophic global warming. Meanwhile it seems what happens in our oceans might be a more scientifically reliable indicator. Amazing!

  3. September 20, 2017 11:50 am

    Richard Lindzen ended a recent presentation with this:

    I haven’t spent much time on the details of the science, but there is one thing that should spark skepticism in any intelligent reader. The system we are looking at consists in two turbulent fluids interacting with each other. They are on a rotating planet that is differentially heated by the sun. A vital constituent of the atmospheric component is water in the liquid, solid and vapor phases, and the changes in phase have vast energetic ramifications.

    The energy budget of this system involves the absorption and reemission of about 200 watts per square meter. Doubling CO2 involves a 2% perturbation to this budget. So do minor changes in clouds and other features, and such changes are common. In this complex multifactor system, what is the likelihood of the climate (which, itself, consists in many variables and not just globally averaged temperature anomaly) is controlled by this 2% perturbation in a single variable?

    Believing this is pretty close to believing in magic. Instead, you are told that it is believing in ‘science.’ Such a claim should be a tip-off that something is amiss. After all, science is a mode of inquiry rather than a belief structure.

    • Jack Broughton permalink
      September 20, 2017 4:34 pm

      I think that a serious aspect of the poor science has been that so many luminaries and learned bodies have signed-up to and supported the “proven science” that they cannot now back down, even if they see the light.

    • AZ1971 permalink
      September 20, 2017 9:25 pm

      Amen, Ron.

    • Athelstan permalink
      September 21, 2017 5:39 am

      Thanks Ron, Amen Dr. Richard Lindzen.

  4. Gerry, England permalink
    September 20, 2017 12:42 pm

    The failure of the warmists’ models to model the planet would tell a competent person that there must be something missing. What we need is to explore what drives the changes in the AMO, PDO and ENSO but then I guess there isn’t any grant money for this.

  5. September 20, 2017 1:30 pm

    Reblogged this on Climate Collections.

  6. September 20, 2017 4:06 pm

    The atmospheric tail is not wagging the oceanic dog.

  7. Athelstan permalink
    September 21, 2017 5:44 am

    Solar radiation in some amount! and oceans, coriolis, clouds and wind too, axial tilt, heliocentric orbit, water, water phases, cycles and water oh and N, Ar, O2………………………………natural CO2………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..mmco2? – ha, ha, ha,ha – nah.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: